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K-P’s Mohmand gets its own Wall of Kindness

Pakistan Red Crescent Society (PRCS) and Mohmand Press Club joined hands with the district administration to roll out a Wall of Kindness in Lower Mohmand.

The charity wall is situated along the main Peshawar Bajaur road at Lower Mohmand Ekka Ghund.

Lower Mohmand Assistant Commissioner Touseef Khalid along with officials of PRCS were present for the inauguration.

Khalid urged the local called for residents to generously donate to cause for the homeless and poor.

“Instead of throwing your clothes away, give them here with the winter season coming,” Khalid said.

Promoting charity: Wall of kindness set up in Bajaur market

He added that more charity walls would be rolled out in other areas of the district.

Khalid said that the needy, especially the orphaned children who don’t have warm clothes would greatly benefit from this act of kindness.

“These small acts of kindness can have a lasting impact on those who have no one,” he added.

Samiullah, an area resident said that,” this is a great initiative which can bring about change in our society.”

The resident said that apart from warm clothes, food rations should also be given here.

 

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The Neighborhood Coffeeshop That Serves Up Cups of Kindness

When it comes to kindness, take it from the shop that serves joy on the side of their java.

First, somebody showed up with a bunch of balloons. Then a cake. Then a big Happy Birthday banner that was stretched across the parking lot next to the Beca’s Brew coffee stand. And people just kept showing up, dozens in all. It was a party—just as Beca Nistrian had envisioned for her pal Will Tinkham. May 10 was Tinkham’s birthday, and she wanted to surprise him.

Tinkham, 32, was born with developmental disabilities and loves people. Nistrian, 30, the spunky owner of the stand in this fast-growing Seattle outpost of 45,000, thought he was wonderful—and a business asset. So she proposed an arrangement: If Tinkham showed up every day for an hour or two and chatted with the customers at her drive-through window, she’d give him a free drink. Pretty soon, an hour or two turned into the whole day.

Nistrian gave him a raise and more responsibilities.

“It’s great,” Tinkham told KOMO News. “I have fun being here and have a great day, and she pays me a lot of money!”

Nistrian actually thinks she’s getting the better end of the deal. “He finds the smallest things to be happy about, and I’m over here stressed about minute things. He finds joy in everything.”

Not everybody appreciated Tinkham’s special brand of enthusiasm. Nistrian noticed that some people would ignore him when he’d say hello. “One customer was extremely dis­respectful,” she says. She gave him his order for free and asked him to please never come back.

Nistrian was so upset that she posted a sort of ode to Tinkham on a community blog. She also mentioned his approaching birthday. Without any more planning or prompting, neighbors showed up to celebrate with Tinkham on his big day, and he greeted everyone with a hug and a smile.

Among the crowd: four police officers, who gave him a ride in a police cruiser—siren on, of course. “This is AWESOME!” Tinkham kept repeating.

Nistrian was so inspired by all the spontaneous good spirit that she proposed that Bothell establish every May 10 as Cup of Kindness Day. The city agreed, and it even issued a proclamation that declared Tinkham to be “an exceptional conversationalist with a kind, joyous soul.”

On the first Cup of Kindness Day, Beca closed her shop and delivered cookies to police officers, firefighters, teachers, day care center workers and others “who serve other people, but not for the money,” she said. She had asked customers to drop off cookies and got so many they filled her car and it took her all day to deliver them.

It didn’t take long for others to join in on the acts of kindness. A church gave a group of single moms massages, flowers, and other gifts, and the local trampoline park let kids jump for free.

You don’t have to wait a year though to see folks being nice in Bothell. Although the small city is growing, with tech jobs moving in and wineries cropping up in the fertile area soil, it still feels like a small town. Jason Dunbar, who lives on the outskirts of Bothell, wanted to help the homeless people in the area, so he and his father-in-law rigged an RV into a mobile shower.

They also handed out donated clothing and toiletries, along with a free lunch for anybody who showed up.

“We get an amazing amount of stuff. We give away a hundred pairs of socks a week,” he says. “We’ve got one guy who gives us a thousand pairs of socks a year.” Local firefighters install smoke alarms free for residents. The local veterinary clinic vaccinates pets at no charge and microchips them for just $5.

“If you are ever in need of something, Bothell has you covered,” says one of the people who nominated the town, Joanna Elder. “The community really rallies around people.”

Of course, if you want a cup of coffee in Bothell, just header over to Beca’s. You know your drink will come with something extra-special: kindness.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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This simple act of kindness filmed on a train is going viral

Blowing up on Reddit today is this short – but beautiful — gif of an unidentified young man on the subway performing a very subtle act of kindness. Can you spot it?

Having trouble?

Don’t worry, you’re not the only one. 

Pay close attention to the elderly passenger as she slowly sways forward as the car rocks back and forth. Notice how the guy ever-so-slightly reaches out his hand to protect her head from hitting the subway car’s metal pole.

OK sure, it’s a pretty small act of kindness, but it’s the type that make this world just a slightly more enjoyable place to live in.

It’s also the kind that goes viral — after being posted less than two hours ago, it’s already the #1 post on the front page of Reddit.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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People asked to perform acts of kindness in remembrance of Becca Schofield

People are being asked to perform acts of kindness in remembrance of a young New Brunswick woman who inspired good deeds before dying of cancer.

The provincial government has proclaimed Sept. 15 the second annual Becca Schofield Day.

Schofield, who lived in Riverview, started a campaign to encourage kindness after being diagnosed with terminal brain cancer in 2016.

People were asked to perform random acts of kindness and share them on social media using the hashtag #BeccaToldMeTo.

It became a global movement, inspiring thousands of people around the world before Schofield died on Feb. 17, 2018, at age 18.

In 2017, the legislative assembly unanimously passed a motion recognizing the third Saturday of September as Becca Schofield Day.

 

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Chalk it up to kindness

Kindness has been written in stone as students returned to school on Sept. 4.

For the second year in a row, Shell Scotford’s Fuelling Kindness campaign brought 65 volunteers together in an effort to write welcome notes on the sidewalks around 23 elementary schools in Sherwood Park, Fort Saskatchewan and Bruderheim.

The only local elementary that didn’t see welcome messages from Shell was the new Davidson Creek School, as Elk Island Public Schools had requested Shell let the new facility’s grand opening speak for itself.

Welcoming notes were the most recent Fuelling Kindness initiative by Shell Scotford, as encouraging sidewalk chalk surrounded local elementary schools on the first day of classes.Photo Supplied

Other than that, each Park elementary saw colourful drawings on walkways, accompanied by positive messages, such as, “Be a flamingo in a flock of pigeons,” “Believe in yourself,” and “Amazing school year this way.”

“We wanted each team to personalize what they wanted to say, what they felt passionate about, and what they wanted to say to students, parents and teachers,” said Conal MacMillan, external relations advisor with Shell Scotford.

“There wasn’t one unified message, beyond saying we’re here, we support you and we want you to succeed.”

Chalkers took to the streets around 6 a.m., with Shell volunteers accompanied by local politicians.

“I was so happy to be invited by (Shell Scotford) and decorate sidewalks (at Pine Street Elementary School),” Coun. Katie Berghofer wrote on Twitter following the morning rush of kindness.

And the schools were happy to see it.

“I can’t stress how happy we were to see our sidewalks adorned with positive messages to start our day,” Holy Spirit Catholic School tweeted. “To those Shell employees who started spreading joy in the wee hours of the morning, thank-you! We are so blessed!”

Many other schools, including Brentwood and Wes Hosford elementaries, echoed similar sentiments, both noting the positive impact such an initiative has on students as they return to classes.

Throughout the region, similar thoughts were noted, as schools, parents and teachers expressed their thanks.

North of the county, Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville MLA Jessica Littlewood took part in the artistic action, later noting the “important… messages of support” being scrawled for students.

“Small acts have a major impact,” Littlewood said. “Shell continues to be at the centre of our communities by always giving back where they live.”

Bruderheim Mayor Karl Hauch, who also participated in the Fuelling Kindness initiative, added his belief that kindness is contagious.

“Today’s effort to fuel kindness is an effort to help children start their school year off right by showing kindness to others,” he said.

“Sounds corny, but it’s true. It makes a person feel right in this world to try to make a different in the lives of others.”

Last year’s sidewalk chalk flash-fuelling was meant as a one-off surprise to students and teachers, but the seemingly random initiative saw a significant amount of positive reaction.

MacMillan noted the amount of in-person and social media thanks received were part of what contributed to the team being encouraged to take on the Fuelling Kindness approach again this year.

“We’re going to do it again next year,” he already committed to. “And we’d love for everyone in the community to come out and join us, so it won’t be just a Shell thing, but more of a community activity.”

Shell Scotford has been carrying out its Fuelling Kindness campaign through different initiatives over the past four years.

 

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Students Prove That “Kindness Rocks”

They could show up just about anywhere. On the sidewalk, in a parking lot, on a supermarket shelf. And if they make you smile, they’ve done their job.

“Why not sprinkle some color and some kindness on them and really spread the cheer by something you can find anywhere,” Abby Heimer asked.

Few things are more unspectacular than a rock. But maybe the key to turning something forgettable into something memorable is in what you do with it.

“Kindness rocks are rocks that are painted with kind words and encouraging sayings that will be passed throughout the community just for people to find and cheer someone’s day,” said Abby Heimer with Wealth management Solutions – Ameriprise Financial.

Students Prove That “Kindness Rocks”

It’s the group that’s promoting the project.

And on Thursday, the kids at Holton Intermediate school in Austin had a chance to spread the cheer.

“I wrote lovely because people are lovely and they don’t even know it,” one Holton student told us.

“Stay true to yourself,” said another, “because it really doesn’t matter what other people think. it’s about what you think of yourself mostly.”

And from a third: “I wrote be happy because everyone needs cheering up in life.”

“I think with back to school it’s just a reminder to be kind to each other,” Abby Heimer said. “You never know what anyone else is going through so it’s always nice if you can brighten someone’s day by doing something simple like painting a rock and having someone find it.”

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Daughter Arranged Surprise Acts Of Kindness For Her Mother With Breast Cancer

here are few things more important in life than love and friendship, especially in times of need, which is why one daughter has gone to extraordinary lengths to bring joy to her mother, who has stage four breast cancer.

Elly Li, aged 59, was diagnosed with the illness last year. Secretly, her daughter WaiLo Li arranged for her best friend of 40 years – known as Auntie Ling – to travel all the way to Birmingham from California for a surprise visit.

Auntie Ling, who isn’t a blood relation but is a close family friend, made the trip using air miles gifted to her by her own son Kenson, who had been saving for a trip to Europe but gave her the tickets “without hesitation”.

WaiLo Li said she had told her mum to expect a photographer at the door who was coming to take photos of the family. But what she got instead was her best friend at the door – who flew on her own for the first time to make the trip.

WaiLo Li told HuffPost UK she wanted to bring happiness to her mum’s life, following what had been multiple rounds of gruelling chemotherapy. Her and Auntie Ling met four decades ago as “factory girls” in Hong Kong, where as teenagers they were working to help their families “make ends meet and to put food on the table”.

WaiLo organised for her mum and Auntie Ling to go on sightseeing tours together – including at Worcester Cathedral, Hadley Bowling Green, and the River Severn.

“I’m hugely thankful that Auntie Ling was able to spend some time with and support mum in the UK, during this difficult time… For us, it’s friendships like these that are truly priceless,” she said. “I’m so chuffed we were able to pull off that one, they’d been close for many, many years.”

WaiLo has organised several trips with the help of friends and family, all designed to give her mum amazing experiences and cheer her up.

WaiLo also took her mum to Santorini in Greece for a holiday and arranged for another friend, Auntie Lan and her family, to make a surprise visit from Hong Kong. They spent three days together in Oxfordshire and the Cotswolds sightseeing.

She told HuffPost UK: “I’ve been planning a series of surprises for mum ever since she was diagnosed last year mainly to cheer her up, help her take her mind off things and create some happy memories. There’s not much I can do other than be there in terms of for hospital appointments and be a dutiful daughter.”

Her brother, Wai-Chung Li, also ran the Birmingham half marathon in aid of Cancer Research last year.

WaiLo said she wanted to speak with HuffPost UK to raise awareness of breast cancer and to help to break the “stigma” of talking about it in East Asian communities.

“One of the reasons why we’re doing it is that as British Chinese we wanted to share the story not only to highlight breast cancer awareness but also cancer in minorities. It’s about breaking the silence and breaking the stigma – especially for East Asians. More talking, awareness, openness, and understanding is needed.”

She said she hoped the video would encourage more people to get screenings and help break the taboo about illness.

“Love, support, and understanding can only be a good thing for millions of people going through one of life’s hardest hurdles,” she added.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Two groups one message, kindness

An Iowa man who is traveling across the country spreading kindness, stopped in Sterling over the weekend.

Jeff Lenhart of the “BeeKind Across America” journey connected with the Huitt family whose group “Random Acts of Kindness for Tucker” shares a similar message.

You may have noticed a bright yellow Vespa cruising the streets of Sterling.

It belongs to Jeff Lenhart. He’s had a goal for the last three years to travel the country not just anyway but by spreading kindness.

“I think there’s more good than bad in the world today but we don’t always realize it,” said Lenhart.

Lenhart said he was bullied throughout school which is what prompted him to start his journey.

For the past month, he’s volunteered from state to state and connected with those making a difference in their community, like the Huitt family.

Misty Johnson and her family created “Random Acts of Kindness for Tucker” or “RAK4T” to honor her late six-year-old son Tucker Johnson who died in a go-kart accident on their family farm in 2011.

“After his accident we were just overwhelmed with all the kindness and the love and support we received so we kind of wanted to honor his soul with promoting kindness,” said Johnson.

She said they sell shirts and donate proceeds to different charities, nonprofit organizations and families in need throughout the year.

Which is what connected them to Lenhart when he noticed Johnson’s niece wearing a “RAK4T” t-shirt in Washington, D.C.

“We talked for a little bit and took a picture together,” said Lenhart.

Johnson said she and Lenhart stayed in touch through social media and was lucky to meet again with one last message and hope to keep her son’s memory alive.

“Just the message of the shirts themselves get so much attention and were able to keep telling his story and remembering him through all of that,” said Johnson.

Lenhart is headed to Amarillo, Texas next then he’ll head to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Gloversville teenager recognized for act of kindness

17-year-old Jordan Laverdure is a junior at Gloversville High School.

Last week, he was playing basketball with friends when he spotted a homeless man.

“He’s not really walking, he’s leaning onto the cart,” said Jordan. “Then I looked down and I saw his shoes. They were just ripped up, torn apart.”

Jordan ran over, took off his own shoes– a pair of Steph Currys– and put them in the man’s cart, then re-joined his game.

“I felt good about myself because I could tell when he said thank you, it meant something to him,” he said.

Samantha Graham happened to be across the street.

“I was shocked,” she said. “My jaw dropped. I didn’t know what was going on and I saw that, I was like, oh, my God!”

At first, she worried the teens might be about to give the man some trouble.

“I thought maybe they were trying to start something with him, so I rolled my window down and turned my radio off and I looked over and Jordan’s running over and he gave him his shoes off his feet!” she said.

She was so moved, she wrote about it on Facebook. She wrote, “I don’t know about you, but in the messed-up world we live in, witnessing that made my entire year. And I pray to God my children do acts of kindness like that every chance they get.”

Her post quickly spread, with many likes and shares.

School officials say Jordan is not a student who has countless shoes in his closet.

He will be recognized at the school’s pep rally this week.

“I guess it stands out because I think the reputation or the perception of students today just isn’t what Jordan had done,” said Gloversville High School Principal Richard DeMallie.

Dr. DeMallie says it’s important to find the strengths in every student.

“Obviously, Jordan’s strength was kindness and caring and thinking about other people. Someone’s ability to find that in our city and then put that out there and have it go viral was exactly what I was talking about. Rather than looking at a student playing basketball and maybe being loud, now we see a student that crossed the street, put his shoes in someone’s cart because that person didn’t have any.”

The school notified us about Jordan’s act of kindness. He’s amazed at all the attention.

“I honestly was doing it for me. To feel good about myself. So that’s what I did. The next morning, I woke up and it’s all over. I woke up with a new life, that’s what it felt like.”

Jordan says he’d like to become a Gloversville police officer some day.

The shoe store near Walmart has already offered Jordan new sneakers. He says his real reward was in giving.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Serena Williams Just Performed a Stunning Act of Kindness

How do you recover from an emotional meltdown?

That’s the challenge tennis player Serena Williams was recently faced. Williams, one of the most celebrated tennis stars of all time, lost the U.S. Open to 20-year-old Japanese phenom Naomi Osaka.

But during the course of the game, Williams received a warning from the chair umpire, Carlos Ramos, who believed Williams’ coach was sending her signals. (Williams’ coach later admitted to coaching Williams, although he doesn’t believe she saw him.) Williams reacted strongly to the accusation.

“I don’t cheat to win. I’d rather lose,” she told the umpire.

Six games later, the umpire issued Williams a second code violation after she smashed her racket in frustration, resulting in an automatic point loss. In the ensuing conversation, the previous cheating accusation came up and Williams demanded an apology for accusing her of cheating. When he refused, she called him a thief for “stealing” a point from her.

At this point, the umpire issued a third violation for “verbal abuse,” resulting in a lost game for Williams. U.S. Open officials rushed onto the court to examine the matter. At the end of the conference, though, the decisions stood.

Osaka went on to win the match convincingly. But as she and Williams stood for the trophy presentation, the crowd loudly booed and jeered, protesting what they felt was unfair treatment leveled against Williams.

Osaka notably pulled her cap over her eyes, to hide her reaction. Both she and Williams were in tears.

Then, something extraordinary happened.

Williams put her arm around Osaka’s shoulder.

She then addressed the crowd:

“I just want to tell you guys she played well, and this is her first grand slam. I know you guys were here rooting, and I was rooting, too, but let’s make this the best moment we can. We’ll get through it. Let’s give everyone the credit where credit’s due. Let’s not boo anymore. We’re going to get through this, and let’s be positive. So congratulations, Naomi. No more booing.”

Amazingly, not only did the crowd then stoop booing, they erupted into voracious cheers.

Williams went on to thank the crowd, joyfully expressing her desire to be at the Open again, despite her admission that playing there had been tough on her.

The crowd applauded.

Osaka applauded.

Williams certainly allowed her emotions to get the better of her during the match–but her actions on the podium were a powerful example of positive emotional influence: the ability to inspire others to think differently, to see things from a new perspective, and even to change their behavior.

We can only imagine what was going through Williams’ mind at the moment. A fierce competitor, she likely felt that she was robbed of a championship.

But Williams also showed clearly that the last thing she wanted to do was take away from Osaka’s moment. So, she got control of her emotions, congratulated her opponent, and convinced the crowd to do the same.

It was a remarkable demonstration respect and empathy–and it was one more reason why opponents’ respect for Williams is so great.

“It was always my dream to play Serena in the U.S. Open finals, so I’m really glad I was able to do that,” Osaka said. She then addressed Williams directly: “I’m really glad I was able to play with you. Thank you.”

To use one’s emotions as a power for good, to inspire and motivate others–that’s emotional intelligence at its finest.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio