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A grandma surprised her granddaughter with a Pride-themed act of kindness

This grandma surprised her granddaughter with a small gesture that went a long way when she ironed her bisexual flag just in time for Pride.

Lexie Nobrega, a student from Virginia, was getting ready to attend Capital Pride in Washington DC when she noticed her grandma Hermina making sure her flag was looking its best.

Posting on Twitter, she said: “Such a simple gesture, but it holds so much love and meaning for me.”

Lexie said: “As I was getting ready to go to Pride, my grandma came into my room and took it upon herself to iron out my flag.

“The gesture meant so much to me because I spent so many years worrying about how my grandparents would react to me being bisexual.

“They immigrated to the US from Guyana in the late 1960s, and the Caribbean nations are known for being very homophobic. However, when I finally came out to my grandparents during my senior year of high school, they gave me a big hug and said, ‘That’s okay, we love you’.”

Lexie said: “What my grandmother did was so simple, she thought nothing of it. She just wanted to make sure that I went to Pride looking my best.

“I will forever cherish her kindness, love, and acceptance for all people, and I am so happy that my story could resonate with so many people.”

The Tweet now has over 16,000 retweets, and Hermina’s sweet gesture has touched the hearts of plenty of social media users.

Washington DC’s Pride event took place on the weekend of June 9-10 in America’s capital city.

Lexie said: “I had an amazing time with all of my wonderful friends.

“Being surrounded by hundreds of other proud LGBTQIA+ people and celebrating everything that makes us who we are is a powerful feeling.”

 

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Chapman Honda promotes kindness in two day event

Chapman Honda is hosting a two-day kindness event.

Customers, employees and their families, and the members of the public were invited to the dealership this weekend to paint kindness coins, spin the wheel of kindness and get pictures taken in the kind photo booth.

A Chapman Honda spokesperson says the event is part of their corporate culture to promote kindness in the community. The event is also part of Honda’s national week of caring.

 

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Kindness Mural is a reminder that Ridgefield is family

Ridgefield celebrated kindness today with the unveiling of our town-created Kindness Mural, a project that spanned one year and brought locals together in the name of inclusion and love.

At the center of the project was the Ridgefield Youth Commission (RYC) and their Chairperson, Denise Qualey.

Joanne and Bruce Hunter, who own the Danbury’s Art Spot worked with dozens of Ridgefield community members to help create this colorful mosaic mural that hangs on the Governor Street Barn, in the heart of Ridgefield.

The Ridgefield Chorale provided beautiful music and speakers, including First Selectman, Rudy Marconi; Scotts Ridge Middle School principal, Tim Salem; Boys and Girls Club of Ridgefield Executive Director, Mike Flynn and Youth of the Year Chris Cozens, and Jason Cianciotto, Executive Director of the Tyler Clementi Foundation, reminded attendees that kindness can change lives.

Today was a shining example of how one community is making the world a better place. “Ridgefield is family,” First Selectman Rudy Marconi remarked. We are blessed to be part of such a remarkable family.

 

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Kentucky father and daughter serving up kindness weekly

Every parent hopes they can instill in their children a sense of giving back, compassion and empathy. A Scott County father has found a way to do that with his daughter through a weekly program the two started together. Each week through a hot meal the two are serving up love to those in Lexington who may need a second helping of it.

Every Wednesday, just like clockwork at 6 p.m. you will find a weekly good deed going on in downtown Lexington. At first you might drive right by, but then you notice the line forming.

In the last two years a lot of people have counted on what’s happening under the Martin Luther King Blvd. overpass.

“This is the best day of my week being able to come down here,” Tom Viney said.

Tom and Allie Viney of Georgetown are a father and daughter duo serving up kindness with a side of compassion every single week.

“I wanted to do something to give back to the community. I was lucky enough to be involved in community activities growing up so I wanted something that I could get my daughter involved with as well,” said Viney.

In 2016 Tom was a father cooking up an idea to spend more time with his little girl. Allie, who was 12 at the time, remembers the first time hearing what he wanted them to do.

“He called up and said we are going to Lexington and bringing a big pot of soup and feed people. We went that night and it was the greatest feeling I have ever had in my life, and I knew right then we needed to do more of this,” Allie Viney said.

And so they did. In two years the Vineys have been a blessing to countless people. They turned that spur of the moment idea into a nonprofit called Serve. It’s a simple name, for what the Viney’s say is a simple weekly gesture.

“It’s really anyone in need, I don’t care if you are poor college student or someone who is struggling through a hard time. We are going to make sure they get a nice healthy meal,” said Tom Viney.

Serve now has an army of volunteers who show up week after week and to date have helped serve more than 10,000 meals.

At 14 now, Allie Viney has never missed a Wednesday. She has seen what a warm, healthy meal coupled with a smile can do for another’s soul.

“They are so appreciative, every single one of them. They are always so polite and say thank you,” Allie Viney said.

Each week people come and go. For a moment they don’t have to think about what’s next. They can just enjoy a meal and know that a father and daughter loves them enough to keep coming back week after week.

Tom and Allie insist it’s all of the volunteers who deserve the credit for keeping Serve going week after week. Many of those they serve each week say the meals the Viney’s and Serve prepare are some of the best they have ever had.

 

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Cardinals’ Jermaine Gresham responds to internet fame after act of kindness

Much to his surprise, a $50 act of kindness made Arizona Cardinals tight end Jermaine Gresham an internet hero.

“It was crazy,” he said after the Cardinals went through voluntary workouts recently. “I really wasn’t expecting it.”

It all started when Gresham was standing in line behind Delilah Cassidy at an American Airlines gate at Los Angeles International Airport.

He could hear her being told that under the airline’s policy, she had to pay $25 for each of two carry-ons that wouldn’t fit under her seat. She had cash but it wasn’t accepted at the gate so she was in danger of missing her flight. So Gresham pulled out his credit card and paid, a random act of kindness.

“That’s pretty much what it was,” he said. “I hope anyone would have done that. I don’t know. I just felt that’s how I was raised, my core values. Somebody in distress, just help them out. Nothing more, nothing less.”

To say Cassidy was grateful is an understatement.

“She was very nice,” Gresham said. “She was very, very, very appreciative. She thanked me I want to say maybe 20 times.”

Cassidy said that when they landed, she offered to pay him in cash but he declined and told her to pay it forward.

She had her photo taken with Gresham and told her story on Twitter. It went viral.

Gresham had no idea until he heard from a Cardinals employee who follows such things.

“He said, `You’re a viral sensation,’ I said, `For what? I didn’t get arrested,”‘ Gresham said. “He sent me this picture and everything and I was like, `Oh, wow.”‘

He seemed surprised that what he considered a small gesture wound up being such a big deal.

“I was right there,” he said. “I had my wallet in my pocket. Just here, swipe my card. It’s 50 bucks. Catch your flight. There wasn’t much to it.”

Gresham, who is recovering from Achilles tendon surgery, said he made a great investment.

“I hope everybody in the world would do something like that,” Gresham said. “Seeing her smile and her appreciation was worth it 10 times over.”

Of course he couldn’t escape some gentle ribbing from teammates.

“That’s the Walter Payton Man of the Year right there,” offensive tackle D.J. Humphries said as he walked by.

 

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Bismarck police officers recognized for act of kindness after balloon rescue

Three Bismarck police officers are being recognized for their act of kindness to a 4-year-old boy.

A post on the department’s Facebook page says they received a letter from a Bismarck woman wanting to highlight what the officer’s did.

The letter read:

“This evening while my family and I were out for dinner, we ran into your officers enjoying their supper. During our meal we spoke with them and they gave our 4-year-old son a junior officer badge. We know one of the officers and thus were visiting with him and his colleagues.

When we left the restaurant, my son had a balloon in the car that blew away. Naturally, he was upset as any 4-year-old is when they lose their balloon.

Unbeknownst to us, the officers witnessed the event. After arriving home a short time later, we had a knock at our door and visitors for our son. The three officers brought him a special balloon and took picture with him.

I wanted to share this with you, because I think it is important to recognize all the kind acts our officers do that many people do not hear about. This random act of kindness meant a great deal to us and our son.

Thank you to all three officers for showing my family the goodness in all people and the value police officers bring to our community. We are lucky to have great people watching out for us!”

 

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Kindness suits kids

RIVASIDE Hockey Club’s under 11 juniors “feel like real players” and look the part thanks to a ­generous donation.

A Grade men’s player Peter Holt sponsored 40 playing tops for the Hookin2Hockey program age group, who previously had only polo tops to wear.

Rivaside president Kerry Wood said the next generation of players were vital to the club and the Sunraysia association and it was important for them to feel included with uniforms.

 

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Culture of Kindness

Evolving out of the labour riots in Jamaica in 1938, meant to secure the rights of workers, the stage was set for what is now recognised as Labour Day on May 23 annually.

Labour Day in Jamaica took on additional meaning in the 1970s when then Prime Minister Michael Manley urged Jamaicans to do volunteer work on the day in furtherance of community and national development.

“Let’s put work into Labour Day,” Manley said at the time.

The commemoration now attracts the attention of corporate bodies, volunteery groups and individuals, adding their contribution to the development of Jamaica by engaging in social projects and building a culture of kindness.

This year was no different as activities took place islandwide.

 

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Neighbor’ reveals Mister Rogers’ kindness

The documentary “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” is about public TV’s Fred Rogers of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”

The late children’s show host doesn’t seem like a terribly dynamic film subject, but Oscar-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (“20 Feet from Stardom,” “Best of Enemies,” “The Music of Strangers”) became interested in Rogers’ “radical kindness.”

“Kindness doesn’t get a lot of airtime in our culture today,” he said when the movie screened at the San Francisco International Film Festival. “It’s not sexy, and it’s a lot easier to manipulate people — or make money off of people — with fear or anger or hatred, than it is kindness. But it doesn’t mean that it’s not important.”

The idea for the movie came to Neville when he was having lunch with famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma, the subject of the “The Music of Strangers.” Neville asked Ma how he learned to be a famous person, and Ma replied, without thinking, “Mister Rogers taught me.”

The filmmaker began researching Rogers, including listening to commencement addresses he gave, and came to a conclusion.

“This is a voice I don’t hear anywhere, anymore. He was incredibly non-judgmental, which feels revolutionary, where our culture is so full of judgment. I just wanted to spend time with that voice, and give platform to that voice,” says Neville.

Many scenes in the movie illustrate Rogers’ kindness, curiosity and compassion, as well as a general openness; its makes the viewer wonder if he was like that.

“He was. All the time,” says Neville. “Everybody in Pittsburgh has a story about Fred Rogers. I’d tell people what I was working on, and everybody I talked to, like a cab driver, said, ‘You’d better not screw this up. Don’t tell me Fred Rogers had a dark side.’”

Neville found Rogers to be even more impressive off camera than on. He constantly struggled with the fear that he wasn’t doing enough. “It means that it didn’t come easy. We all have to work hard to be good,” Neville says.

The movie shows Rogers’ famous puppet Daniel Tiger — a clear and powerful alter-ego for Rogers — getting people to open up, or to “melt,” as Neville describes it.

During editing, Neville was considering switching a line of Daniel’s dialogue from one scene to another, being momentarily concerned that the voice wouldn’t sync with the lips. Then he and his crew suddenly realized: Daniel was a sock puppet. His lips didn’t move.

“It didn’t even occur to us, because he’s so… alive. You imagine him talking, even if you don’t see him talking,” he says.

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” rises to a level of profundity as Neville asks interviewees to try something that Rogers often asked people: Take a moment and think about someone who helped you become who you are.

The film shows the interview subjects, one after another, for several seconds, in complete silence, thinking of their special people. It’s overpowering.

“I didn’t know if that was going to be in the film, and I certainly didn’t know it was going to be the ending,” says Neville. “What I didn’t want to do with the film is tie it up neatly in a bow. I wanted to ask some questions and hold up a mirror.”

“I think that’s what Fred would do,” he continues. “I hope, when you come out of the movie, you’re left thinking about how you may participate in perpetuating radical kindness.”

 

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Students’ creations benefit others

Rory Strickland is a third-grader at the School of Arts and Sciences at The Centre and she’s a fan of the “Little House on the Prairie” series.

Written by Laura Ingalls Wilder, the books chronicle a pioneer family in the late 1800s. They are loving, resourceful, cooperative and hard-working. Without access to modern conveniences, they make things by hand and often rely on one another to overcome life’s challenges. They accept help from neighbors when necessary and provide support to community members in need.

This appeals to Rory’s creative and civic-mindedness, especially as she explores a special art unit focused on traditional crafts and service learning. Rory and her classmates are studying utilitarian artforms including basketry, soap making, felting, crocheting and weaving.

“I like the feeling that I’m from a long time ago,” she said. “We learned about American history and this is what people used to do. Back then, kids would help their parents with the stuff around the house by making things like this.”

Designed by art teacher Heather Light, the lessons serve as a vehicle for students to work with their hands and hearts by understanding the value of service to their community. In donating some of their work to charity, student learn that, through creating, they can show kindness to others.

This is a lesson Rory has already internalized. She said, “I love helping people. It makes me feel above and beyond good. If you don’t help people, to me, you’re not human.”

In the development of this unit, Light drew upon her own background and interest in traditional arts. With an overarching classroom theme of kindness and community, the service learning component was an obvious extension. By combining learning goals and community service, Light hopes to enhance both student growth and the common good. “I want to build that intrinsic motivation to love and care for other people,” she said.

One of the most popular class activities was knitting hats and second-grader Jewel Fernandez proved to be prolific. She and other art students often took materials home so they could continue their work. The finished hats will be donated to children going through cancer treatment. Jewel said “some people’s hair falls out so we made hats so they could be happy. It feels good and it’s fun. It’s nice if you help people when they’re sick.”

Fourth-grader Izrael Castro gravitated towards the felted soap project. “You get a piece of wool,” he explained, “and you spread it over the soap. Then you get another piece of wool and you cross it over the first one. You do that about five times. Then you put a little water and you start massaging it so the wool can merge together. It sticks on the soap and it helps to get the dirt off when you use it.”

Izrael could think of many potential beneficiaries of his felted soaps, including those experiencing homelessness. He feels it’s important “to treat others as though they’re your family. It makes me feel really good give away things I made myself.”

That’s an outcome Light is capitalizing on. She said “creating something, no matter what it is, it’s a way for any child to feel successful. They’ve created something that wasn’t there before. If they’re motivated and focused and their heart is in it, that’s where you’re going to get the product and the process coming together. It becomes meaningful for them. Giving them a tie into service learning; that serves as motivation as well.”

Light received an Arts Education Grant from the Council on Culture & Arts. With the grant funds supplied by Kia of Tallahassee, she was able to take two continuing education courses to refresh her own knowledge of traditional art forms.

She also purchased wool for the felted soap and reeds and bases for basketry. She supplemented those materials with yarn and crochet hooks donated by The Sharing Tree. This collaborative sourcing approach reinforced the goals of these lessons.

“It hones the idea that we’re all connected; we’re all in this together,” Light said of the unit. “People matter, your feelings matter, what you do for people, how you treat them, it all matters. Hopefully, that’s going to be infused in everything they do here. Art is such an easy way to infuse that and be able to create for others.”

 

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