News

Stranded groom makes big day after act of kindness

Mike Enright was stranded about 25 miles (40km) away from the Lincoln Hotel, where he was due to wed Gina Metcalf.

Heavy snow had left Mr Enright, his parents, and best man Ben Yarnell unable to reach the venue.

But the groom was able to make it at the last minute when a local car dealership provided two 4x4s to transport him to his waiting bride.

The group had been unable to escape from Horncastle, Lincolnshire, after the county was hit by a wintry blast.

Mr Enright and his family spent around an hour waiting for roads to be cleared but could not get out of the market town.

Ms Metcalf had joked that “everyone dreams of a white wedding but not necessarily the one I’m going to get.”

After Mr Enright senior called BBC Radio Lincolnshire about the family’s plight, Lincoln Audi got in touch and offered to send a vehicle to transport the party, as well as the wedding cake and flowers.

They arrived at the venue on time – with about an hour to spare.

Mr Enright said the last-minute help had been “an amazing gesture”.

“I thought I was going to be stranded there,” he said.
Image copyright Mike Enright
Image caption Earlier, the groom and best man posted a picture of them stranded in Horncastle

About 70 guests had been invited to the wedding service – but at least 20 people cancelled because of the weather.

Earlier, the groom, who had dreamt of a spring wedding, said: “It feels a bit nervy but we hope to make it through.”

“I’ve said ‘wait for me at the hotel’.”

Mr Enright said he had spoken to his bride-to-be by phone but of course had yet to see her at that point.

“Ask me and Gina if we are laughing about it in a year’s time”, he added.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

College student goes viral with random acts of kindness video

A 19-year-old New York college student’s video showing her random acts of kindness has gone viral.

Gabriella Ricciardi, of Eastchester, went around her town handing out $1 bills to strangers and sharing laughs, smiles and stories with them.

“This whole process made me realize even more that it is the little things in life, the smallest amount of money made someone’s day, and just seeing them smile made mine,” Riccardi said.

Ricciardi says she was inspired by Drake’s music video “God’s Plan,” where he gives away a million dollars. Her budget was a bit less, at $23, and she recorded the entire experience on her iPhone.

“This was an amazing experience, we had so much (fun) making it, shared a lot of laughs, and I can honestly say I’ve never felt this good,” said Ricciardi.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Random acts of kindness and Easter bingo in Hoghton for George’s Legacy

Gillian Hinds, from Hoghton, set up George’s Legacy in 2015 in honour of her son, who died just a few days after he was born in 1997. His twin, Thomas, survived and he will mark his 21st birthday in July.

The appeal supports parents that have lost a baby, helping with photographs, dressing the baby, funeral arrangements and emotional support.

The 56-year-old, who also has sons Nathan and Ashley, added this year she was determined to raise more awareness to honour what would have been George’s 21st birthday.

As part of this she will be carrying out random acts of kindness to strangers in need of a little lift.

She said: “I did my first act a couple of weeks ago. They are not planned and so the opportunity will arise naturally to help someone.

“For example, if a child or adult needed a birthday cake but could not afford one, I would buy them one, seeing as I won’t be able to buy George a cake.

“I am hoping it will make someone really happy. I am one of those people who love giving and doing things for others. It makes me feel good knowing I have made someone else feel happy.”

Gillian is also holding a family Easter bingo at Bamber Bridge County and Catholic Club, Aspden Street, Bamber Bridge, on Friday March 29, from 7pm.

The 56-year-old said: “This fund-raising is important to families and also to me personally, following George’s death.

“When I set this up I never thought it was grow as well as it has.”

I thought I would get a few likes on my Facebook page but now I am sending support packs out to as far as America and Canada.

“I supply early loss support packs to 10 hospitals, including the Sharoe Green unit at Royal Preston Hospital. We also fund baby’s headstones as some families are unable to afford them.”

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Becca Schofield’s final act of kindness shared at funeral

Becca Schofield, the New Brunswick teenager who inspired acts of kindness around the world, performed her “last act of kindness” on Valentine’s Day, the day of love, her uncle said Wednesday during her funeral service.

As cancer ravaged her body, Schofield’s final days were spent mostly sleeping, Denis Savoie said in a eulogy to his niece at a Riverview church.

But on Feb. 14, the 18-year-old woke one last time before succumbing to her inoperable brain tumours three days later at the Moncton Hospital.
“We saw, through Becca, how people can be good”

“We saw, through Becca, how people can be good”

“With all her wisdom and her courage, she found the strength to tell her family it was time for her to go. She was ready,” Savoie told the crowd gathered at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church and those following the live video feed of the funeral from the overflow seating at the church hall.

“This is more than just a gift of love. She gave them the permission, the courage, the serenity to let her go. She gave them peace.”

About 250 people from across New Brunswick attended the celebration of Schofield’s life, including dignitaries, such as Lt.-Gov. Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau.

The Riverview teen captured global attention in December 2016 when she launched the #BeccaToldMeTo campaign after her terminal diagnosis, urging people to perform random acts of kindness.

Savoie thanked the public for supporting the family through to the end of Schofield’s “journey” and for helping make her dream come true.

“She wanted to make a difference on this earth before leaving it — and she did,” he said.

“We saw, through Becca, how people can be good. We saw how far kindness can go. We saw how a positive attitude can help you focus on the now to appreciate what you have today.”

Schofield put aside her fear and “focused on living, not dying,” he said.

She “didn’t have time to waste having regrets or to complain.” She “had a vision and was on a mission.”

“Thank you Becca for leaving the world a better, kinder place.”

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

How a simple act of kindness in McDonald’s inspired a community to come together

A dad has brought together a community to raise money for a little girl whose mum succumbed to an illness.

Aaron Fuller, 28, had taken his three-year-old son Jack to McDonald’s earlier this month.

A young girl, who he later found out was five-year-old Phoebe Jefferson, approached his son and accompanied him while he played on one of the iPads in the Whitstable branch.

He explained: “She asked me what nursery he goes to and I explained, then when I asked her where she went to school she said ‘I was going to school, but I have to move school now because my mother died last night’.”

While Phoebe was playing with Jack, she went back to her grandparents and asked to give him a packet of Smarties.

Aaron added: “You could see she had a tear in her eye but she was still willing to go get some sweets for my son.

“She was willing to show kindness and it was really touching.

“You don’t know what will happen – life is short – so I thought I would come up with a fundraiser and do something special.”

Aaron was so touched that he decided to set up a fundraiser for Phoebe, with the money raised going towards her future.
‘A sweet little girl’

Phoebe’s grandparents, Eric and Janet Jefferson, are both 71. They previously lived in Sturry before moving to Reculver about a year ago.

Their 45-year-old daughter and Phoebe’s mother, Vikki, suddenly passed away due to illness on Valentine’s Day.

Janet explained how she felt when Aaron got in touch and explained he wanted to raise money for Phoebe.

She said: “The kindness of a complete stranger blew us away and we couldn’t believe how touched he had been by her.

“She’s a very sweet little girl.

“This is going to benefit Phoebe and that’s all that matters to us.

“Thank you to everyone who has donated, bless them, and rest assured that it will all go to a good cause.

“We are going to keep Vikki’s memory alive as much as we can.”
Community response

Currently more than 80 people have come together to raise over £1,300 for the fund.

Eric and Janet still have not decided how they would like to spend the money, but most of it would be put into a trust fund for Phoebe’s education later on in life.

Aaron is a postman who delivers in the Whitstable High Street area.

He spoke to staff at Reppin & Jones Jewellers in Whitstable, who have since donated a locket necklace to Phoebe, which will include a photo of her mum.

Aaron added: “Everyone has come together – friends, family and random strangers.

“There have been so many nice responses and it has been really rewarding.”

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Polish students get lesson in kindness from across the world

Modern technology is helping students have multi-cultural conversations from opposite sides of the world.

Poland Middle School held a joint Skype session with a school in India on Tuesday.

The session was held to talk about important issues that many cultures experience such as education and poverty.

According to Supervisor of Community Engagement Julie Bercik, she says that the event was set up by a man who travels the world to spread the message of peace and global unity.

The students were able to answer questions from the students in India and Poland students were able to ask questions as well.

“The most interesting, I feel, is that we all have similar like-mindedness and we all think the same,” said Poland 8th grader Noah Dearing.

Poland Middle School’s Counselor Mary Jo Rowan said, “It’s all about reaching out, making connections with other cultures, with other people and making your community feel like an inclusive setting.”

The Skype session was part of the middle school’s pursuit in the Capture-Kindness Month.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Crestwood Primary students get lesson in kindness and compassion

Kindergarten through second-grade students as well as staff and administrators read “The Invisible Boy” by Trudy Ludwig for the fifth year of One School One Book.

“The Invisible Boy” is about a boy whose classmates never seem to notice him until a new student befriends him, after he makes the new student feel welcome.

In addition to reading the book, nearly 300 people attend a family night, where students come with parents and rotate between activities that correspond with the book such as making friendship bracelets for kids to give to a new friend. Other activities included eating a snack with chopsticks like one of the characters in the book, a song station, art projects, a parachute game in the gym and even watching a video and answering trivia questions about the book.

Monica Grebb, a teacher at Crestwood Primary, said one element of the book she enjoys is that at the beginning of the book, The Invisible Boy is drawn in a black and white outline but as he is befriended and included, color is added to him and he is in full color like the rest of the kids by the end of the book.

“The kids really picked up on that, so we encouraged them to wear bright colors, because we want to make every child feel seen, included and bright,” Grebb said.

Jennifer Gilles, a Crestwood Primary teacher, said the kickoff assemblies were held during the school day, and students were able to video chat with the author who also engaged them in activities.

Gilles chose the book this year after seeing it on Facebook, and felt the subject matter tied in well with what the school tries to teach kids at that level.

In the past, she said books were suggested by staff members, or chosen from the One School One Book program website. In the past students have read, Shel Silverstein’s “Where the Sidewalk Ends,” Avi’s “Poppy” and Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.”

The program is completely funded between the Parent Teacher Organization and the principal’s account, including each student getting a copy of the book to keep. Sometimes outside vendors such as the Akron Zoo have been enlisted to bring animals or other items for students to see during the activity night but this year so many teachers pitched in that the activities were all done in-house.

“It really is a labor of love,” Grebb said. “We love doing this; it’s a lot of work but because of our principal and our staff and our supportive PTO, it is so worth it.”

Some teachers even incorporate the book into the curriculum such as a writing project where students had to write about a time they felt invisible.

Gilles said the intermediate school does its own One School, One Book program but it is mostly incorporated into the school day and the book they choose is geared toward the older students.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Parents paint messages of joy and kindness on school bathroom stalls

When an elementary school in Texas picked happiness as this year’s campus theme, a group of parents decided to bring the cheer straight to the students — and to their bathrooms.

The parents worked for 37 hours last weekend to surprise the kids at Mary Moore Elementary School in Arlington.

Motivational messages of hope, kindness and unity are now artfully splashed across the fifth grade stalls and water fountains.

Parents painted bathroom stalls to reflect a Texas school’s positive learning environment.

“The teachers work really hard, the students really apply themselves to get good test scores, so the parents wanted to add that theme of joy [to the atmosphere],” Principal Tyson Jones told CNN.

Almost 900 students are enrolled at Mary Moore. None of the students had any idea that the transformation was underway and were shocked when they returned to school on Monday, said Jones. The school was filled with smiles all day, and the kids took pride and ownership in the powerful project.

Some of the most powerful phrases include “You will move mountains,” “You are enough,” and “She believed she could, so she did,” in the girls’ bathroom.

Parents painted bathroom stalls to reflect a Texas school’s positive learning environment.

“It’s to remind them that they can do anything they want if they try hard enough,” Jones added.

The parents contributed their own funds and accepted donations from Home Depot, Sherwin-Williams and local businesses, JC Nails and Great Oak Dental, to complete the job.

The school is looking to spread the campus theme, which is based on the book “The Happiness Advantage” by Dr. Shawn Achor, to the rest of the bathrooms as well as the cafeteria and other common areas.

The school shared photos of the final product in a Facebook post, which has been shared more than 100,000 times. The impact of the messages has been received far and wide. A number of schools have reached out to see how they can follow in Mary Moore Elementary’s example.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Families Are Penning Positive Messages On Rocks And Hiding Them All Over The UK

Families are writing lovely messages on rocks and hiding them around the UK in what is quite possibly the nation’s biggest (and most wonderful) game of hide and seek.

Kindness Rocks is an initiative which started in the US, but soon found its way across the pond.

The idea is that people write and draw on pebbles and leave them in hidden locations. Strangers then find the pebbles, feel uplifted and hide them again.

It’s a cycle of positivity which is taking places like Salisbury, Reading, Chester, Tyneside and Norfolk by storm.

“Rock painting is a very accessible and inexpensive activity for anyone and everyone to do,” says mum-of-three Kristina Auckland, who set up Salisbury’s offshoot of Kindness Rocks last year after seeing it take off in the US.

“I love that it’s getting people outside and exploring. Seeing the photos on the Facebook group of the proud little faces when they’ve either hidden or found some painted stones is amazing.”

The groups vary in size: Reading has just over 800 members, Salisbury has 1,300 while Norfolk and Tyneside’s groups operate on another level entirely, with over 37,000 members and 27,000 members respectively.

One of Norfolk’s members, Karen Harrison‎, took to Facebook to explain how finding a beautifully-illustrated rock with the message “dream” brought her joy during a particularly tough time.

She shared her feelings on the group page and received a reply from the person who had illustrated the rock, Polly Johnson, who said she could keep it. “I hope things soon get a bit easier for you,” she added.

Angela Thompson discovered a rock with the message “smiles are contagious” while out walking in the woods with her son and friends.

“The weather wasn’t brilliant, so when we saw the rock it made us all smile. You see someone laughing, you laugh too,” she explains.

“My son was so excited. It does inspire you to create some rocks with messages on and place them for people to find. You hope it makes someone’s day when they are feeling down.”

Other rocks that have been found dotted around the country feature messages such as “you’re a star”, “I believe in you” or “lots of love”.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Kinsmen celebrate kindness with parking deed

It’s what they do – help the community in any way they can.

The St. Thomas Kinsmen club will be covering the cost of parking at the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Saturday.

Saturday is the sixth annual National Day of Kindness, which is celebrated by each Kinsmen club in Canada.

“Every Kin club in Canada gets together and does something to give back to the community,” said Matt Sharpe, president of the St. Thomas Kinsmen club.

For the last two years St. Thomas’s club has provided free parking at the city’s hospital.

“From 10 (a.m.) until 5 (p.m.) the gates will be up,” Sharpe said.

The club members got together and decided to cover the cost of parking because of the impact the act will have locally.

“It’s a feel-good feeling when you know that people that have been in the hospital for various different reasons, expecting to have to pay for parking, coming out and finding out there’s a couple Kinsmen standing by the change meter saying, ‘You don’t need that today,’” Sharpe said.

Paul Jenkins, STEGH Foundation’s executive director, said the biggest message that can be taken from the Kinsmen club’s act of kindness is that it isn’t the first time the club has stepped up to help the hospital.

“We’ve had a long relationship with them,” Jenkins said. “They’ve been donors extraordinaire.”

Jenkins said covering the cost of parking takes away one extra stressor for people visiting the hospital.

“It removes just one small burden,” Jenkins said.

The St. Thomas Kinsmen are constantly looking for ways to give back to the community such as Canada Day fireworks and the annual Easter egg hunt.

“We do different events to raise money for the community,” Sharpe said.

Kin Canada has been around since Feb. 20, 1920 and the National Day of KINdness is a way for members to celebrate the club’s founding. The St. Thomas club was found 25 years later in 1945.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio