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Kindness of Perth and Kinross enough to melt hearts in the snow

The Beast from the East bared its teeth last week – but it could not break the spirit of the people of Perth and Kinross.

While the country was brought to a virtual standstill on Wednesday and Thursday, stories have emerged of incredible generosity and kindness.

An appeal has been launched to find out the identity of a mystery Good Samaritan who spent Friday morning handing out bread and milk to vulnerable people while one man helped 30 nurses make their way to work.

In the North Muirton area of Perth a woman, going only by the name of “Debbie”, was spotted walking up and down Argyll Road supplying elderly residents with free bread and milk in the wake of “The Beast From The East”. One grateful recipient, 77-year-old Pat Forsyth, admitted she was “bubbling all day” after having her heart melted by the gesture.

She told the Perthshire Advertiser: “It was so nice, on a day like that, to see someone thinking of others.

“I was running out of bread and milk, and I was worrying about how I would get more.

“I heard the knock at my door and wondered who it could be. I can’t explain how it felt, and I can’t believe what a lovely act of kindness she’s done.

“She was going round all of the older people’s houses – and that’s a lot of houses. It’s bad enough having to go and get shopping for yourself on a day like this, but to do it for so many others – there’s not many people who would.

“I watched out my window as she went to the other houses and everyone felt like I did.”

Debbie’s actions came following reports that the Co-op store in North Muirton had run out of bread and that neighbouring supermarket Asda had run out of milk.

Another local who came to the rescue through the snow was Perth tradesman Lee Walker, who helped take around 30 nurses and doctors to their work in his 4×4.

Speaking on Friday he said: “There was not much I could do work-wise outside with the weather, so I thought it would be a good idea to give people a hand.

“At the end of the day, we didn’t expect this weather. I have already picked up about 26 people from PRI to Auchterarder and quite a few in Stanley, and I will be taking them back from the hospital too. It has been a very full on day for us.

“In this weather we can’t do any other work, so we are as well going out and doing something for others.”

Meanwhile Perthshire weather watcher Norman Pedgrift has confirmed that last Wednesday was Perthshire’s coldest day in EIGHT YEARS.

The correspondent said February was as cool as January, only drier, with the average temperature coming in at 2.3 degrees Celsius, 1.7 degrees below the average.

There was 40mm of rainfall recorded, also down on the average of 65mm, along with a whopping 16 days of air frost.

 

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How kindness and swift action of strangers saved life of sick Chinese girl

A mother has thanked people for answering an appeal on social media and saving her seriously ill daughter’s life by rushing a drug bought in Hong Kong to her hospital bed in southwestern China, a

The daughter Song Shurui, 17, has leukaemia and had a bone-marrow transplant in December, Chengdu Commercial Daily reported.

However, Song got a severe lung infection after the surgery, giving her a fever and putting her life in danger.

Her mother Dai Qinjia was quoted as saying doctors at the hospital in Chengdu gave her daughter little chance of recovery and moved her to intensive care.

Chinese woman donates part of her liver for transplant to save husband’s life

Dai maintained a vigil at her bedside in the following weeks, refusing to believe there was no hope, the article said.

“I just didn’t believe my daughter would die and wanted to try everything with my last strength,” she said. [Song pictured while she was seriously ill after the transplant. Photo: New.qq.com]

Doctors said the drug Cidofovir, not sold on the Chinese mainland, could relieve Song’s acute symptoms, according to the article.

Her mother appealed for information on social media last month and a man who had obtained the drug in Hong Kong to treat his daughter with leukaemia got in touch.

“When Dai called me for the drug’s information at about 2am, she cried all the time and repeatedly said ‘please help save my daughter’,” the man was quoted as saying.

He bought the drug later that day and arranged for it to be shipped immediately to Shenzhen airport.

He then asked another person, who was not named in the article, to fly the same day to Chengdu to deliver the medication. Song received the drugs 14 hours after they were bought.

The medication quickly took effect and Song’s temperature gradually returned to normal over the following days.

How an obscure Chinese hospital became a beacon of hope for foreign cancer patients

She was moved out of intensive care on Monday, three weeks after getting the drugs.

Her mother told the newspaper: “I really wanted to bow to everyone who helped me buy the drug. Without any of them, my daughter might already have passed away and I cannot imagine how could I live my life without my daughter.”

 

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Elementary school students reach out to Parkland with ‘Kindness Rocks’

Students at Mechanicsville Elementary School are reaching out to students in Florida after the deadly school shooting with a special project.

“Everything just stopped.”

February 14, should have been a day filled with love, but for Tamara Letter, it left like Sandy Hook all over again.

“Just grappling with the realities that we’re faced with another situation that’s beyond our control,” she added.

Letter is an institutional technologist at Mechanicsville Elementary. She found her passion for “Kindness Projects,” or acts of kindness, right around the time of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Ct.

The students have been working on “Kindness Projects” all year, funded by a grant for Hanover County.

They happened to be working on one of them when tragedy struck Parkland, that’s when the 5th graders decided to dedicate their work to the students affected.

“It was an immediate paralysis of mindset of what to do,” she said, thinking about what happened in Parkland.

On Valentine’s Day, she was working with students on another project, painting rocks with words and phrases to spread joy around the campus. The project was funded by a grant and was inspired by “RVA Rocks.”

“I was wondering, what on earth can we possibly do to go across those state lines.,” Letter added.

Her idea: ask the 5th graders if they would share these “Kindness Rocks” with the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Teachers didn’t go in depth about what happened, telling the students there was a tragedy.

“Put a bit of joy into their school,” elementary school student Samantha, 10, said.

“It makes them feel good inside, and happy, because of what happened,” said Mackenzie, another classmate.

Letter transformed seventeen of the rocks into memorials.

“So that way each of those lives that were lost – their names could be remembered,” Letter said.

Student to student, sharing a ray of hope.

“Let them be happy and always remember that there’s always a bright side,” student Bethany said.

Show no matter how small, kindness goes a long way.

“It’s very evident that we needed to do more with kindness,” Letter said. “We needed to do more with teaching out children the best ways to feel empowered, to do the right thing, to make a difference in the world and to be the good.”

The rocks will be mailed to Parkland, Fl. soon.

Part of the project is about engaging on social media, kind of like “RVA Rocks.” Click here to get an up close look at the project.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Simon Thomas reveals stranger’s act of kindness in coffee shop

Simon Thomas has revealed a stranger’s act of kindness following the untimely death of his wife Gemma in November. The former Blue Peter presenter told his followers on social media on Monday that he had received an anonymous note from behind the counter when he took a trip out to his local coffee shop, Nomad Bakery, in Reading.

When the dad-of-one went to pay, he was handed a piece of paper, which read: “Please could you take this as payment next time Simon Thomas comes in with his son Ethan for a drink and cake! Let them know everyone is wishing them both strength and happiness.”

Simon Thomas recieved a kind note from a stranger when he went to his local coffee shop

The Sky Sports presenter shared a photo of the note on his Instagram account, and wrote besides it: “Some wonderfully kind people out there. Someone left this in @nomadrdguk today.

Whoever you are – thank you. God Bless.” This isn’t the first time that strangers have been touched by Simon and Ethan’s heartbreaking story. In January, one of Simon’s social media followers – Dan Ritchie – took time to write Simon a daily note to encourage him to carry on through his grief.

The notes were inspired by Simon’s snack notes – which he writes for his eight-year-old son each morning, and has taken to sharing them with his loyal fans each day.

Simon and his son Ethan tragically lost Gemma in November

Earlier in the month, Simonhad Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield in tears as he bravely went on This Morning to talk about his wife’s death. Holly had tears streaming down her face as the bereaved father-of-one revealed how he had told the couple’s eight-year-old son that his mother had died. ”

All the way back [from the hospital], my heart was pounding. He [Ethan] went in to see her twice that day. I didn’t tell Ethan she was going. I said, ‘Mummy is seriously ill’ and I held him close to her ear a couple of times and he said he loved her. And then he went to play with his cousins.”

Heartbroken Simon announced the death of his 40-year-old wife on 25 November. “Today I am crushed with indescribable pain,” Simon told his followers”

“Just three days after falling ill with Acute Myloid Leukaemia, my dear wife Gemma passed away yesterday evening surrounded by her family and friends.” He added: “If you are a prayer – pray for my boy Ethan. 8 yrs, precious and in bits. Thank you.”

 

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Firefighter from NY travels to Parkland to spread kindness

A volunteer firefighter from New York has made it his mission to make people smile, even if only for a minute, to honor those who can’t do that themselves anymore. That mission brought him to Parkland.

“Kindness is the common thread that sows us all together,” said Tommy Maher of South Hempstead, NY.

Last year, Maher traveled 9,500 miles across the country doing random acts of kindness in the hometowns of the 58 victims of the Las Vegas shooting.

“There’s no better way to remember than to honor by doing good things,” he said.

When the shooting happened at Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day, he knew what he needed to do.

“Honor them as best I can because they didn’t deserve what happened to them,” he said.

Maher got in his van, which is aptly labeled with the phrase “pay it forward,” and he started driving south.

On the way down to Florida, Maher gave out gift cards, paid for gas and groceries and even paid for a veteran’s hotel room.

Every act of kindness is accompanied with an “#honor17″ bracelet and a card that has the name and picture of a victim who inspired that act of kindness.

“You never know how someone’s day is going and then a moment like that can just completely shift and change how they’re going to feel the rest of the day,” he said.

Since being in Parkland, Maher has left soccer balls and basketballs at parks, given gift cards to deputies, delivered boxes of chocolates to librarians and more. He shares pictures of all of the acts of kindness on the Facebook page Honor17.

“It all just depends on the dynamic of where I am, what’s around me,” Maher said. “Sometimes I’ll just be driving and I’ll think of something and I’ll just do it.”

While buying gift cards to put on car windshields in Coral Springs Monday, Maher spotted the car of the Coral Springs Fire Department’s chaplain in the parking lot. He went inside the neighboring restaurant where the chaplain was eating lunch and paid for his meal.

“I was very honored and touched,” said Ron Perkins, chaplain for Coral Springs Fire Department. “It’s the first time that anything like this has happened to me.”

Maher also gave Perkins’ waitress, Letizia Atwell, a $40 tip.

“It’s amazing when people can shine a little bit of light in a dark time,” said Atwell, who works at Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza. “Everything is appreciated.”

Maher said he initially funded his random acts of kindness himself, but people in his community in New York now help him out.

He plans to head back to New York this week, but he hopes he’s inspired others to keep the chain of kindness going.

“Hopefully the kindness continues and I like that phrase, ‘Just be the good,'” he said.

People around the country have been posting pictures of their own random acts of kindness in honor of the 17 Douglas shooting victims with the hashtag #honor17. You can follow Maher’s journey at Honor17.

 

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Stepping up to show kindness

Grade 1 students at Father Gorman Community School took the lead on kindness last Wednesday.

As part of Kindness Wins and Pink Shirt Day, the Grade 1 students put on an assembly to show some of the things their Top Secret Kindness Kids Club has been working on.

“One little boy told a story about how when he was at 7-Eleven with his family, some guy held the door open for them, then his dad held the door for the next person,” said Kaitlin McKenzie, Grade 1 teacher, about some of the stories her students told.

“It’s just him making that connection there are simple ways in our everyday life we can be kind. So, having them see those moments outside of this is really cool, and ultimately, the goal is for kindness to be a habit for them.”

Kenzo Tejidor was one of the Grade 1 students who helped put on the Kindness Day activities. For him, he said kindness meant to “be happy and to be nice.”

For Grade 1 student Daphne De Guzman, she said kindness was “loving and nice” and doing nice things for others such as compliments.

The older students really appreciated what the Grade 1 students put together.

“I think it’s really cool that at such a young age they are able to learn how to respect people and how they should be treating people,” said Brayden Milley, Grade 7.

Grade 7 student Parice Cromartie also echoed the words of encouragement and how proud she was of the younger students.

“Not being mean to others,” she said she hoped was something the younger students learned from Pink Shirt Day.

“For them to be so young, it’s shocking kids at this age are learning that kindness wins.”

The project got started after they received a grant from Beyond Borders Circle of Change to put on various activities.

After, the students wrote out Kindness Wins in the snow with a drone flying over, as well as drinking ME to WE tea.

“With the money we received from the grant we purchased tea from David’s Tea … David’s Tea had partnered with ME to WE in hopes to raise awareness about consumer choices and being kind. So, we purchased the tea to share with the rest of the school,” said McKenzie.
Overall from the entire day, McKenzie said she was proud of her students.

“It’s so amazing,” she said. ” I don’t want them to see themselves as little Grade 1s, even in Grade 1 we can make a difference and they have proved that with some of the things they have been doing. I couldn’t be prouder, they are absolutely amazing, and hopefully some of these things carry out into their everyday life as they grow older.”

 

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Check out these acts of kindness in the chilly weather

In these freezing cold temperatures, most of us probably aren’t too keen to leave our warm houses and head outside, unless we really have to.

But lots of people across the UK have been braving the cold, and going out of their way to help out others.

After all, not all heroes wear capes – although in these freezing cold temperatures, hopefully they all have warm coats on.

Here are just some of the acts of kindness, big and small, that might help warm your heart (even if they won’t help thaw out your cold fingers)…

On Wednesday night, hundreds of drivers in Scotland spent the night stranded on the M80 motorway.

But they got some relief, due to the kind-hearted gesture of Barry Currie.

He heard how bad the conditions on the roads were, so took some pizza and Irn Bru out of his fridge to give to the stranded motorists.

Stranded motorists on the M62 in north west of England were given hot drinks, food, and blankets, while someone brought a bottle of warm milk for a five-week-old baby.

In the North East, drivers who’d been stranded for 13 hours were treated to a free doughnut by Greggs delivery driver Jon.

His lorry was full of cakes and doughnuts, and so he walked up and down the A1 handing out free snacks.

In Norwich, Claire Whitehouse wants to thank her neighbours for helping clear the road, so that she could travel to the hospital.

Claire’s baby was due to be born any day, and because the weather was getting worse her husband decided they should go to the hospital in case of an emergency.

He went out to clear the road of snow, and soon half the street were giving him a hand.

Roads and pavements have been so icy and slippery, that a lot of you have had difficulty getting to school, or walking and driving even short journeys.

Things can be even more difficult for older people – so members of a residents’ group in Kirkcaldy, Fife stepped in to help.

Volunteers from New Linktown Tenants and Residents Association went around the area checking if their elderly neighbours needed anything, and did their shopping for them.

Lots of you have had snow days from school, and some adults haven’t been able to make it into work because of the weather.

One woman in Cardiff posted on social media that the hospital where she works has been desperately short-staffed, because people hadn’t been able to drive into work.

She asked:”Does any kind person with a 4×4 want to help ferry some staff in?! Please help!”

And kind-hearted strangers, some 40 miles away in Swansea, offered to help.

One man even said he’d be taking the next two days off work to give lifts to any NHS staff who need it.

It wasn’t just here, where 4 x 4 drivers offered to help. Former Newsround presenter Jake Humphrey offered his car to “vulnerable” people via social media.

And even without access to a 4 x 4, some people have gone the extra (eight) mile(s) to make sure they can still do their job – like one surgeon in Glasgow.

She apparently walked almost three hours from Anniesland, in the west of the city, to Paisley, to operate on a cancer patient.

Andy Renwick, who works with the doctor, told BBC Scotland he didn’t want to give out her name. But he told how she’d arrived at work covered from top to bottom, and with “walking poles, snow goggles and snow shoes on”.

She’s not the only one determined to do her duty.

Sharon-Ann McIlravie, helps to deliver babies. She’s been staying overnight at her work to make sure she can still do her job.

And for coffee drinkers in Edinburgh, their hero came in the shape of this lady!

 

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Newton Aycliffe care home manager wins kindness award

A CARE home manager has won an award for his ‘great work’ with residents day-in day-out.

Jason Parkinson, manager of HC-One’s St Clare’s Court Care Home, in Newton Aycliffe, received one of the company’s Kindness in Care Award.

Mr Parkinson was nominated for the award by a colleague who highlighted his ‘kind, caring and professional’ approach. He was described as ‘an exceptional manager who goes above and beyond’, and someone who is ‘always willing to listen’.

Mr Parkinson, presented with his award by HC-One area quality director Mandy Falconer, said: “I am delighted and humbled to have received this award. Every day we at St Clare’s Court strive to provide the kindest care to residents, and it is a pleasure to be a part of such a dedicated team.”

HC-One managing director Stephen Butterworth said the awards recognise the kindest care and best practice and St Clare’s Court has a manager who deliver both.

 

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Paloma Faith Urges Public To ‘Spread An Epidemic Of Kindness’

Paloma Faith has urged the public to be kinder and more tolerant towards others as part of HuffPost UK’s HumanKind project.

“If we all donated a few kind gestures a day, and let a few more petty things slide, the world would be better,” she wrote in an exclusive blog post, which launches the project. “It doesn’t matter how big or how small what you do is. It’s important you do it.”

HumanKind is a celebration of kindness in the UK, where we share stories of people performing incredible, selfless acts to benefit others or the planet. We hope to inspire and uplift our readers, who can get involved in our series through sharing these tales of hope, and by nominating people from across the UK who deserve recognition for their kind works.

We know that readers want us to help them to take action: so through HumanKind, we will also tell them how they can make a difference, and run kindness challenges and initiatives to help focus their efforts.

The Humankind project will shine a light on people and projects across the UK making a positive impact. This weekend we featured a heartwarming initiative whereby people paint lovely messages on rocks and hide them for others to find. We’ve also interviewed a mum who, after battling postnatal depression, was inspired by the kindness of her neighbours to give something back. Now she creates and distributes care hampers to people in her local village to give them a much-needed boost.

Faith believes becoming a mother made her think hard about the qualities she wanted to pass on to her children. She has since decided to focus her efforts on teaching them empathy, kindness and compassion. “I wish I was kinder and less selfish and I have decided to try and be,” she wrote.

The singer said that kindness is a valuable currency that is available to all, whatever your budget. “You can spend as much of it as you like without breaking the bank,” she added. “You can do kind things to help the world, like car pooling, switching the light off when you leave a room, reusing plastic containers, using your own bags in the supermarket, recycling, not littering.”

 

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Kindness of strangers pushing us through these cold nights

There’s praise today for the efforts made by many to help others.

Staff at hospitals across the South have slept at work to ensure patients are cared for.

Other people have given up their time and vehicles to help the NHS continue its work.

Meanwhile people are being urged to keep an eye out for elderly relatives and neighbours.

Mary Stanley spent the morning with community nurses in Hampshire. Watch her report:

Hospitals across the region have also cancelled some non urgent appoints – and have praised staff for getting into work.

Here at the Royal Hampshire Hospital in Winchester they’ve used 4 by 4s and provided beds and food to help staff stay overnight.

The bad weather has also affected blood stocks – with the number of donors falling and sessions cancelled.

This one at Horsham in Sussex was set up at the last minute to build up reserves.

 

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