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The UK’s kindest cities have been revealed

A new report has revealed that a quarter of Brits believe the UK’s northern cities to show more daily kindness than the south – but who actually comes out on top?

In honor of Random Acts of Kindness Week, hotel chain Travelodge has conducted a ‘Kindness Report’, surveying 2,000 adults to determine just which UK cities are topping the list for niceness.

The north proved to be champion, with seven out of the top 10 kindest cities being from the northern regions of Britain. In fact, the top three were northern cities.

Coming in at first place was Liverpool, where 55% of residents perform an act of kindness every day. It doesn’t have to be a grandiose gesture either; holding the door open for someone, holding the lift for someone and helping a mum up steps with her pram or shopping proved to be the top nice gestures.

Travelodge launches Mother’s Day offer with rooms going from £29 for a weekend break – but you need to be quick

Third place went to Manchester, where 48% of residents do nice things every day, from giving another driver the right of way to smiling at strangers.

These may sound like small gestures, but 75% of Brits revealed it made their day when a stranger was nice to them – and it was the smallest acts which proved to mean the most.

Brits themselves are a kind nation, with 33% of adults showing some form of kindness to strangers on a daily basis, whether they’re offering up a seat to strangers on public transport or giving someone a compliment.

The UK’s top 10 kindest cities:

  1. Liverpool – 55%
  2. York – 51%
  3. Manchester – 48%
  4. Aberdeen – 40%
  5. Plymouth – 38%
  6. Wolverhampton – 37%
  7. Leeds – 35%
  8. Cambridge – 34%
  9. Glasgow – 32%
  10. London – 31%

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Laurel Middle School hosts first Random Acts of Kindness Week

Amy Caldeira is the 8th grade history teacher at Laurel Middle School. She’s spearheading this campaign to teach others that a little kindness can go a long way.

The eighth grade teacher was asked by Superintendent Linda Filpula to spearhead random acts of kindness week.

“We’re introducing kids to different ways that they can be nice that are really simple,” Caldeira said. “Holding doors, saying nice things, talking to students that maybe don’t have as much interaction with the other kids, inviting kids to sit with them at lunch.”

KULR-8 asked why Caldeira brought attention to this idea.

“My mom passed away in 2001 and the next year, our family members didn’t know what to do for her birthday and so we decided that for her birthday we’d do something nice for someone else.”

And that’s how the school wide campaign was born. It’s a lesson that they can carry with them for a lifetime.

“It’s good for everybody to realize that it doesn’t take much to make other people happy.”

Caldeira said that the buckets posted on the wall in the cafeteria room will be filled with hearts from the students at the end of the week to exemplify their random acts of kindness.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Atria residents, staff members celebrate kindness

Signs offering messages such as “You Matter,” “You are Amazing” and “You are Stronger than You Think” were waved proudly Tues­day as residents and staff members of Eliza­beth­town assisted living center Atria celebrated Random Act of Kindness Week.

Residents and staff members assembled near the intersection of Dixie Avenue and St. John Road near Southeast Christian Church as several drivers honked their horns in acknowledgment of the messages.

Jamie Neaderhiser, engage life director at Atria, said this was the center’s second year celebrating Random Act of Kindness Week and they had a full schedule of events planned throughout the week.

She said staff and residents will take homemade candy to Health­South Lakeview Re­ha­bil­itation Hospital in Eliza­bethtown today and will take sandwiches to local Emergency Medi­cal Services employees Thursday. She said lollipop bouquets also were delivered to Hardin Memorial Hos­pital nurses this week.

Neaderhiser said the sign event was an opportunity to “give back to the community.”

“If you’re having a bad day and you’re driving down the road and you see a sign that says, ‘You’re Stronger Than You Think,’ it puts a smile on your face,” she said.

The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation started acknowledging Feb. 11-17 to encourage kindness in communities around the world.

Atria resident David Clem said this was his second year participating in Kindness Week activities and said he enjoys spreading positive messages.

“The people are so nice us,” he said. “They get out and wave at you.”

Beth Mather, a volunteer at the event, said some who drove by also showed random acts of kindness. She said a driver who chose to remain anonymous gave Clem $40 and participants used the money to buy lunch for strangers at a local McDonald’s.

Mather said she hopes the event will encourage residents to make kindness a priority beyond a week in February.

“It’s just to kind of encourage people to be kind to each other, not just this week, but all the time,” she said.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Town, school take on kindness — Texas style

You can’t have too much kindness.

With that in mind, the Hope Kindness Community in Trophy Club is working with the Northwest School District and the town to spread as much of it as possible during the month of February with Campaign 4 Kindness.

“This addresses everything. Being kind is free,” said Alicia Fleury, Hope Kindness Comity board member.

National Kindness Week is Feb. 12-18.

The national organization Think Kindness also has come on board for the event. Founder Brian Williams said although the organization visits hundreds of schools each year, this is the first time an entire community has come together for such an effort.

“Only in Texas do they go this big,” Williams said

Four Northwest School District campuses that are in Trophy Club will take on the challenge to perform 5,000 random acts of kindness over the remainder of the month. This can be anything from opening a door for another to picking up a dropped pen, or even giving someone a smile.

“Most only cost a little of your time and may require you to step outside your comfort zone,” event chairman Ann DeCapite said. “Trust me, the payoff for kindness is big for the giver and receiver, and always worth it.”

Think Kindness will conduct a presentation for students, teachers and administration at Beck Elementary, Lakeview Elementary, Medlin Middle School and Bryon Nelson High School. They also will conduct a parents assembly at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 12 at Byron Nelson.

“In society right now, it’s not that we don’t want to remember others in random acts of kindness, rather we are often too busy,” said Jamie Farber, Northwest’s director of guidance and counseling.

Campaign 4 Kindness provides a reminder, Farber said.

“It’s pretty cool hearing all the buzz about what’s coming up for Kindness Month. We’re already hanging posters in our classrooms,” said J.P. Maricle, a Byron Nelson student.

Not only is the event designed to get folks in Trophy Club to be kind to each other, it is helping children elsewhere in the world. Members of the community are asked to donate new and gently used sneakers in collection boxes throughout town as part of the Got Sneakers campaign. The shoes will be donated to orphanages in Africa.

The free Feb. 17 Fun Run 4 Kindness begins at 8 a.m. at Byron Nelson High School, 2775 Bobcat Blvd.

Fleury said the Hope Kindness Community was created in September in response to several student suicides in the area. She said the idea was to bring the community together to talk about topics that some might consider taboo.

“We take our kids in for annual football physicals, but do we take them in for an annual health checkup?” she said. “If you fail a test, it’s not the end of the world. If you don’t make the team, it’s not the end of the world.”

She said part of the group’s mission is to get people, especially youngsters, to open up and be honest about things in their life, to deal with things such as death, including suicide.

“We can’t say, ‘Faith died last week.’ We have to say ‘Faith committed suicide last week,’” she said. “We have to be honest and talk about it.”

And though she said none of the suicides are known to have been connected to bullying, that is also a subject with which kindness can help.

“We’re not going to eradicate bullying, but we can learn how to handle it better,” Fleury said. “We can help kids cope with it more.

“It all comes under the umbrella of kindness. Hopefully, it will catch on and we’ll have less of these bad things.”

Trophy Club Mayor Nick Sanders and the town council proclaimed February as Kindness Awareness Month.

“We encourage our residents to participate in Campaign 4 Kindness in the spirit of compassion, kindness, and good will toward all persons,” he said.

“When we all come together, big things happen,” said Byron Nelson Parent-Teacher-Student Association president Karen Williams. “Our town is amazing, and we want to show how many people here support being kind to one another, globally as well as locally.”

Fleury said the hope is other communities will see what is happening in Trophy Club and have similar events.

“We are hoping with this inaugural event word will get out and we will be approaching other communities next year and in years to come,” she said. “Who doesn’t want a little more kindness in the world?”

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Edinburgh is named Scotland’s kindest city

GLASGOW’S claim to be Scotland’s friendliest city has been thrown into doubt after a new report revealed the Capital is the nation’s kindest location.

A report commissioned by Travelodge to mark Random Act of Kindness Day on Saturday found that more than half of people in Edinburgh perform a random act of kindness every day.

The kindness report by Travelodge surveyed 2,000 adults to seek the nation’s views on random acts of kindness.

The most popular random acts of kindness included holding the door open for someone, holding the lift for someone, receiving a smile from a stranger and helping someone with a heavy item of shopping.

The report also revealed that a quarter of Scots believe that more kindness is shown in daily life north of the border, compared to the south of the UK.

The study indicated that 55 per cent of people in Edinburgh dish out a random act of kindness every day – the top location in Scotland. Inverness took second place, ahead of Aberdeen in third place. Midlothian scooped fifth place with 38 per cent of people undertaking a daily act of kindness.

Glasgow could only manage ninth place with 32 per cent – ahead of Greenock in tenth position.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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BSU office encourages to take Beneficence Pledge during RAK week

During Random Acts of Kindness week, the Ball State Office of Institutional Diversity is encouraging the Ball State community to take the Beneficence Pledge.

During the week, the office will have booths set up in the Student Center and the Atrium to allow those passing by to sign the pledge.

The pledge asks those in the BSU community to maintain high standards of scholarship and excellence, to practice academic honesty, to act in a socially responsible way, and to value the intrinsic worth of every member of the community.

Ball State Office of Institutional Diversity Secretary Lisa Love says that this week is an opportunity for the Ball State community to highlight the pledge in their daily lives.

“We love the fact that Random Acts of Kindness week came at such an opportune time that we were able to take our Beneficence Pledge Drive and marry the two together,” says Love.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Sycamore students celebrate kindness

It was a challenge, but the students and staff at Sycamore Elementary School were up to it.

The school participated in the Great Kindness Challenge — a proactive bullying prevention initiative that aims to improve school climate and increase student engagement.

Sycamore Principal Tracy Nabors heard about the challenge at a conference and fell in love with the concept of being kind on purpose.

“She shared it with me, and I took it and made it part of my comprehensive school counselor program and integrated it into my curriculum,” said Sycamore counselor Allyson Evans.

Evans said the challenge is one week devoted to performing as many acts of kindness as possible on campus.

“We did our week of kindness from Jan. 29-Feb. 2,” she said. “Using the provided checklist of 50 kind acts, students accept the challenge and show the world that kindness matters. Some acts were easy such as smile at 25 people, compliment five people, or write a thank you note.”

Others, she said, took a little more effort — like asking a new friend to play or learning something new about a teacher.

“Students turned in kindness checklists at the end of the week,” Evans said. “We had over 1,767 acts of kindness turned in. Our school only has 338 students, so we were excited to have so much kindness spreading.”

A third grade teacher, Deshawn Mattson, said, “I noticed that the kids would keep their kindness checklists on their desk during class, so they would be ready to mark off any acts of kindness they did. I received nice notes, pictures and a few apples throughout the week. I loved it!”
Evans agreed.

“I watched kids encouraging each other, I heard parents reporting kind acts at home, and teachers and staff discussed how grateful the kids were being,” she said. “Being kind on purpose has helped Sycamore be a kinder place.”

The Great Kindness Challenge started in 2012 in three schools in California. Last year, more than 15,000 schools participated. Sycamore was the only school that signed up to do the challenge in Putnam County, but Evans said she hopes it will spread to other schools in the county next year.

Many of the Sycamore students who took part also got to eat lunch at a special table in the lunchroom in order to celebrate and encourage kindness.

“We had special guests eat with them from the school board and central office,” Evans said. “It was a great week and we are already looking forward to celebrating kindness next year.”

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Doncaster man’s efforts win his colleagues ‘time off for kindness’

Big-hearted recruitment specialist John Simpson has shown his stamina by helping to raise £55,000 for a children’s hospice.

John, a business development consultant with HR GO Recruitment in Silver Street, Doncaster, raised a total of £1,500 by taking part in the Paras’ 10 Challenge, a 10-mile endurance race.

This effort was to support valuable work being done in the Forget Me Not Children’s Hospice in Huddersfield.

His impressive effort also led to John and his colleagues being granted extra leave each year so that they can continue to take part in fundraising to help good causes.

The course of the race had to be completed in less than three hours, with a 35-pound pack carried on the back.

HR GO, founded in 1957, celebrated its sixtieth anniversary with a nationwide 60 Acts of Kindness campaign.

Staff in Doncaster, across the UK, and in the firm’s Poland office, skydived, cycled, ran, walked, rattled collecting boxes, rode motorcycles, delivered food, knitted poppies, made coffee, helped children and volunteered many hours of their time to help others.

Their efforts raised more than £27,000 for a variety of charities, a sum that HR GO has matched with a similar donation to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, the firm’s chosen charity of the year.

Jack Parkinson, HR GO plc company chairman, said: “We wanted to celebrate 60 years in business by looking out to the communities that have contributed to our success.

“I’ve been overwhelmed by the enthusiasm shown across the country and the huge efforts by John and the rest of the team.

“I want us now to look to the future and embed a strong culture of volunteering in our various companies.

“That’s why we are continuing the campaign by offering John and all staff two days’ extra paid leave every year to help a great cause of their choice.

“My late mother Betty, who founded the business, would have been proud of what they’ve achieved.”

 

Read the full story here

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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40 days of acts of kindness and charitable donations

LENT is fast approaching and while many of us will looking forward to our pre-Lent pancakes and sweet fillings, the start of Lent can be a marker for much more.

You may be thinking about giving up treats like chocolate, booze or sweets – but did you know there’s also a Lent Challenge?

While most people associate Lent with fasting or abstaining from certain treats, others believe that giving up something can help to purify their bodies.

Other ways to recognize lent include donating money to a good cause, donating to a charity or volunteering.

This year, the Christian Nightlife Initiatives Network is once again promoting the #Do1NiceThing challenge – which they say is about loving the person in front of you as well as serving the wider community to make life better for the people around us – and yourself in the process.

 

What is Lent and how long does it last?

Lent is a 40-day fast, so will run up until the Thursday before Easter Sunday, March 29, which is known as Holy Thursday.
The origins of Lent come from Jesus spending 40 years in the desert, resisting Satan

The origins of Lent come from Jesus spending 40 years in the desert, resisting Satan

It originated as a mirroring of Jesus Christ’s 40 days fasting in the desert, where, according to the gospels, he endured temptation by Satan.

Beginning on Ash Wednesday, the practice actually begins 46 days before Easter Sunday – the six Sundays in between are not counted, as they are not days of fast.

People follow Jesus’ example and give up vices in a bid to grow closer to God as Easter approaches.

Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day occurs the day before Lent begins, symbolizing when Christians would eat up foods such as milk and eggs before fasting.
What can I do for the 40 days of acts of kindness and reflection?

According to Loveyourstreets.org.uk, there are numerous things people can do as part of the challenge.

They even have a downloadable list of set things people can use as a guide – the ideas are generally very simple and require not much thought or pre-planning and can easily be swapped for something else.
The ash for Ash Wednesday comes from the previous Easter’s palm crosses
Getty Images
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The ash for Ash Wednesday comes from the previous Easter’s palm crosses
Ideas for the 40 days:

Valentine’s Day February 14 – Engage in conversation with the people who serve you (e.g. shopkeepers

February 15 – Say thank you to someone as they work and say how much you appreciate them

February 16 – Call in on an elderly neighbour – take some cake, have a cup of tea and a chat

February 17 – Shop locally and support local farmers, local veg growers and local shops

February 18 – Show some love to your neighbourhood and pick up litter or see if there is anything more you can recycle at home

February 19 – Hold doors open for those behind you

February 20 – Smile at people

February 21 – Be a nice driver – spread road-calm!

February 22 – Email / write to a local charity you think does a great work and thank them and those who volunteer

February 23 – Take time to pray for your neighbours

February 24 – Spread the niceness on Facebook and Twitter – compliment some of your friends

February 25 – Set up a Blessing Bag – a bag of items you keep in your car that can be used to bless other people or a Blessing Box outside your church building – place in it a few items that will bless others

February 26 – Write a letter (or use social media) to a local emergency service and thank them for the work they do

February 27 – Say hello to people

February 28 – Look at joining or setting up a Neighbourhood Watch scheme

March 1 – Spot ways of helping people and do it

March 2 – Go on a thankful walk – see all the positive things you can be thankful for in your neighbourhood

March 3 – Buy Fairtrade where you can today

March 4 – Take a single person (elderly person, single mum…) out for Sunday lunch

March 5 – Consider investing some time volunteering – could you give 24 hours over the next year?

March 6 – Commit to collect used stamps for The Leprosy Mission or other charity

March 7 – Catch a bus and say thank you to the bus driver

March 8 – Give a drink to a homeless person or take part in “Suspended Coffee”

March 9 – Email / write to your MP and say thank you for representing you and that you are praying for them

March 10 – Take a prayer walk around your neighbourhood and pray for needs

Mothering Sunday, March 11 – Take some flowers to mothers and grandmas on your street

March 12 – Buy seeds ready to create a wildlife garden (or tub or window box!)

March 13 – Look for ways to volunteer one hour of your time for someone else

March 14 – E-Mail your local councillors and say thank you for what they do and offer to pray for them

March 15 – Take time to discover some new tourist attraction in your area (eg wildlife park, play area, etc)

March 16 – Give away a book you think is worth reading

March 17 – Pay for the drink of the person behind you in a coffee shop

March 18 – Write some inspirational messages on Post-It notes and randomly leave for people to find

March 19 – Help someone down the stairs or hold open a door for someone with a pram

March 20 – Look out for a stranger you can chat to

March 21 – Offer your skills to someone else for free

March 22 – Write a letter to the boss of someone who has given excellent customer service to tell them so

March 23 – Clear out unwanted items and give to a charity shop

March 24 – Organise a free car wash for your community

Palm Sunday, March 25 – Thank people for the virtues they have

March 26 – Send flowers to a friend as a thank you for your friendship

March 27 – Give a New Testament or inspirational book to someone you don’t know

March 28 – Take a box of chocolates to work and say thank you to your colleagues

Maundy Thursday, March 29 – Serve someone

Good Friday, March 30 – Put spare change in a charity box

March 31 – Visit a local shop you have not visited before or in a while (support locally!)

Easter Sunday, April 1 – Get together with others to organise a community or church Easter Egg hunt

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Maryland SPCA’s Kindness for Paws Art Show

On Sunday Maryland SPCA held it’s 5th annual Kindness for Paws Art Show and Sale at White Marsh Mall.

The Name-Your-Own-Price art sale featured more than 1,700 pieces of student artwork from 17 local elementary and middle schools. The inspiration for all of the artwork were pets that were cared for at the Maryland SPCA before they were placed into loving homes. The art includes various styles including paint, colored pencils, statues and paper plate puppets.

The event has grown tremendously over the years beginning with Molly Schappel, an art teacher at Perry Hall Middle School who reached out to the shelter about having her 7th-grade students do a service project for the shelter to raise awareness about all of the dogs and cats that are in area shelters.

“Fundraisers like this means a lot.” Said Katie Flory, Director of Public Affairs and the Humane Education Director for the MD SPCA. “We get no funding from the ASPCA or the government. We rely solely on donations, so every dollar we raise is going to helping animals in our care.”

Over the years Kindness to Paws has raised more than $5,000 for the homeless and hurting pets at the MD SPCA. Events like Kindness have help approximately 15,000 pets each year.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio