News

Scotland’s Winter Festivals to being with kindness campaign

A campaign aiming to share Scotland’s “shared values and inclusive view of the world” has been launched.

The #MakeSomeonesDay campaign will mark the start of Scotland’s Winter Festivals, backed by £550,000 from the Scottish Government.

The campaign kicks off the start of the festivals on St Andrew’s Day, November 30.

The Winter Festivals celebrate Scotland’s culture and heritage over the Christmas period and Hogmanay with events across the country, also marking Burns Night on January 25.

BEMIS, the national ethnic minorities-led umbrella body, is also hosting multi-cultural celebrations as part of the festivals.

The Scottish Government is working with the global Fair Saturday Foundation with a programme of more than 70 nationwide events to help raise funds for good causes and promote fairness and sharing, starting on December 1.

Ben Macpherson, Minister for Europe, Migration and International Development, said: “This St Andrew’s Day presents a positive, inspiring opportunity for all of Scotland, in all our diversity, to celebrate the inclusive, outward-looking and compassionate spirit of our nation – by helping others and by showing generosity and kindness.

“Whether it’s on St Andrew’s Day or St Andrew’s Fair Saturday, this year we can all show the best of what it means to be Scottish by each of us doing something small to #MakeSomeonesDay.

“If each of us does something kind for someone else, together we can make a big, positive impact for the benefit of the whole of Scotland.”

Jordi Albareda, Fair Saturday director and founder, said: “When we began the Fair Saturday movement, we wanted countries all over the world to embrace its ideals of creating social impact though arts and culture.

“It is fitting that Scotland is hosting the first nationwide Fair Saturday festival outside of Spain and we hope the public will mobilise behind our aim of creating a better future for all.”

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Be nice Friday – it’s Random Act of Kindness Day

Chances are that someone you don’t know may buy you a coffee, smile or just say hello to you Friday.

At least five Grey-Bruce communities and elsewhere across Canada where there are community foundations will participate in Random Act of Kindness Day, the day when we’re encouraged to be nice to others.

Community Foundation Grey Bruce is the local hub for the event in Grey Highlands, Kincardine, Meaford, Owen Sound and Saugeen Shores.

“This is the fourth year we’ve done it in Owen Sound,” said Donna Beatty, who sits on the committee of the Owen Sound Community Fund, established with funds remaining from the city’s 150th anniversary celebrations in 2007.

“We just really hope that people will do something different than they usually do and maybe they really initiate some kindness,” she said. “So they might say hello to a stranger on the street or they might smile at someone they don’t usually do that. We’ve heard they might buy the person behind them a coffee at Tim’s.”

Beatty said the aim is to “instil giving kindness and community foundations are all about giving, giving back.” The other aim is to “strengthen the community spirit.”

People are encouraged to post their experiences with random acts of kindness to https://www.facebook.com/randomactofkindnessgb/.

“Even small acts of kindness can literally change lives for the better,” that site says.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Man’s touching act of kindness to mother goes viral

A man who held a stranger’s sleeping baby while the young mother filled out paperwork in a doctor’s waiting room has been praised for his touching act of kindness.

Natasha Wilson, who captured the sweet moment in the US state of Alabama, described the incident on Facebook – pointing out the touching act between the white man and black woman.

“Racism is still VERY real in our society today BUT THIS MAN GAVE ME HOPE & a sweet memory I’ll never forget!!”

According to Ms Wilson’s account, the man asked the mother from across the room if she would like him to hold her baby while she filled out her forms.

The woman smiled and said that would be great.

Once he was holding the baby, the man “rocked and loved on the baby like he was his,” according to Ms Wilson, who posted details of the incident last week.

“If you know this man tell him what an amazing person he is!!” Ms Wilson wrote on Facebook.

The man was later identified as Joe Hale and the woman as Jade West.

“I felt relieved and appreciated at the fact that he wanted to help, he seemed really genuine,” West told “Good Morning America” on Monday.

“He was talking to him as if he was his own grandchild and had known him his whole life. He was just the sweetest.”

Wilson said she wished people would see people for people and not colour.

“For a stranger, a white man at that, asking a young black mother if he could hold her baby to help her out, then the way he loved on that baby like it was his own, it almost puts me to tears every time I think about the love you could see radiate from him for that baby,” she said.

West said while it’s OK for people to think differently, it’s important we take care of one another.

She added: “Regardless of skin colour, we are all just human and can love one another! I truly believe that if each one of us do our part and teach our children that colour doesn’t exist, our next generation could be colourblind.”

One Facebook commenter wrote: “Maybe there IS hope for humanity.”

“[It’s] nice to read a nice story like this after all the hate being spread right now,” another said wrote.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Expect more random acts of kindness in East Tennessean

East Tennesseans may experience more random acts of kindness after Monday. Students left classes at the Knoxville Jewish Day School with a mission: to do a ‘mitzvah,’ or good deed. Head of School Miriam Esther Wilhelm assigned fourth and fifth graders with the task following Saturday’s deadly attack on the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. Eleven people were killed during services.

At a time when many felt hopeless and helpless, Wilhelm said, “What we can do is affect our immediate surroundings in our community, and if one person can bring such evil, and devastate so many families, think of the good one person can do with acts of goodness and kindness.”

Wilhelm said the Torah, or Hebrew bible, teaches that in times of darkness, followers of Judaism should respond with kindness. Student Elli Robbins said, “We are battling those bad things that that man did with the good things, and being kind with mitzvah.”

Wilhelm’s assignment reached beyond her students. Dan Grabel’s daughter attends Knoxville Jewish Day School. He said, “I’ve tried to contact my family and my friends first and check in with them and be in touch with people I haven’t been in touch with in a little while.”

Lia Maman, a young student at KJDS, had already completed her mitzvah, “I’ve done it during recess today, actually a kindergartner was sitting alone and I brought one of his friends to sit with him.”

Wilhelm said many people planned acts of good ranging from visiting with residents of nursing homes to volunteering at animal shelters.
“Somebody said they were going to smile and say ‘good morning’ to everybody that they saw today. There’s no way of knowing the ripple affect of one good deed, one mitzvah, one act of kindness.”

While Wilhelm said none of us could have stopped the gunman who killed 11 people in Pittsburgh on Saturday, she said we can have an impact on the future. She challenged all of East Tennessee to practice deliberate acts of kindness.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Teacher’s act of kindness gives grieving girls a night to remember

A local teacher went the extra mile and then some for his former students who recently lost their father.

Steve Colbert is a Davison teacher who brought them a heartwarming surprise and gave them a night sure to remember.

“I tell them you treat each other like family and I tell them never to miss an opportunity,” he said.

Colbert didn’t want Avery and Olivia Reece to miss out on a special moment to any young girl’s life — the Daddy-Daughter Dance.

In early September, Olivia and Avery’s dad Luke’s health problems began. Colbert had already made plans to invite the girls to join his family at the dance.

The day he planned to ask them to go, Luke’s condition took a turn for the worse. Luke died on Sept. 19 and the dance was scheduled for Oct. 13.

Colbert still wanted to make sure his two former students were able to go to their dance.

“I told them, ‘OK, I am not driving tonight, so one of you is going to work the pedals and one of you is going to work the steering wheel. Somebody could honk the horn and somebody can scream out directions,'” Colbert said.

He purposely was giving them wrong directions to hide a big surprise.

“We rented a limo. I had friends step up to buy their dresses. Another friend stepped up and bought the corsages and my boutonniere and even my own daughter’s corsages,” Colbert said.

The two girls were also treated to a day at the salon to get ready for their day.

“It felt like as if I was a Barbie Doll,” Avery Reece said.

All of them had fun at the dance, although the girls joked that Colbert needs to work on his skills on the dance floor. All of four of them had balloons with Luke’s name on it saying #BeLikeLuke.

“They are important to me just like my own family is and I want them to trust me, and I want them to believe in me the same way I believe in them and trust them,” Colbert said.

Luke was an organ donor and has been able to help 65 people.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

The kindness of strangers gives Lucky the cat a new home

“Relying on the kindness of strangers.” It’s a simple phrase with a powerful message.

I would venture to say that almost every lost or abandoned animal that has survived has done so due to the kindness of strangers.

Such was the case with Lucky the cat.

Realtor Mary Lou Rada first met Lucky when she was checking a property in the community of Golden Gate.

He was very friendly, but he appeared undernourished.

When Mary Lou noticed a woman working nearby, she asked about the cat. The women said she had seen him hanging about for a week or so, and that she fed him Cheerios sometimes. Clearly, the cat needed rescuing.

Mary Lou, unwilling to leave the cat behind, became the stranger whose kindness saved Lucky.

She didn’t have a carrier, blanket or food with her, but she knew someone who did: Katherine Goodman.

A quick call to Katherine brought her to the scene, bearing a carrier and two cans of cat food.

Lucky was so excited to have something besides Cheerios to eat that he ran right into the carrier and gobbled the food down.

Mary Lou and the cat headed home for the night.

The next day they paid a visit to Savanna Animal Hospital to get Lucky checked out.

After a thorough examination, Dr. Ries had some unfortunate news: Lucky suffered from a rare auto-immune disease that caused the cat’s own saliva to dissolve his teeth.

The teeth were unsalvageable, and he had to have every single tooth extracted.

Additionally, the cat had broken his front leg at some point and the elbow had healed in such a way that the leg did not bend.

But Lucky had learned to adapt. Despite his troubles, Lucky remained a sweet and trusting boy.

Mary Lou was confident she could find a loving home for him and set about making some phone calls.

But, before she could find him a home, she received a call from Jennifer Strauss at Savanna. Dr. Ries and the staff were smitten with Lucky and wanted to keep him as a clinic cat.

What a perfect solution!

Lucky’s happy forever home came about due to kindnesses performed by “strangers” who stepped in to help this plucky feline.

No doubt, there are many homeless cats right here in our community. Will you offer a helping hand? Caring Fields Felines does so every day.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Peacekeeper statue a combination of power and kindness

When artist Abbe Godwin took on the task of designing the 6-foot statue of a Marine that now stands watch at the Beirut Memorial, she was given a very specific concept to follow.

But bringing to life the Marine in The Peacekeeper was more than molding a sculpture into a figure for Godwin.

You can see it in his eyes.

The camouflaged uniform and M-16 rifle in the hand of the Marine in the traditional pose of standing guard give the impression of power, but look a little closer and Godwin hopes you’ll also feel a level of kindness when viewing the statue.

“The challenge in this piece was to give it a sense of presence; to give the figure a sense of power but also a feeling of good,” Godwin said.

Godwin said she has tremendous respect for the men and women who serve our country as guardians of freedom, and that service is for good.

“I believe we’re a force for good for the world,” she said. “We could use that force for bad or for good and I think our country uses it for good.”

Godwin now lives in Greensboro but was born in Jacksonville and her family has strong connections to the area. Her husband is a former Marine and her grandparents were among the landowners in the area that is now Camp Lejeune.

“Jacksonville is special to me,” Godwin said.

When she heard about the memorial plans and that they were looking for someone to create the statue, she didn’t hesitate to apply.

Godwin said she has to be engaged with the subject matter for her to take on a project and she also wants the public to respond to what they see when they view the Peacekeeper statue or any of her artwork.

Part of what draws people to Godwin’s work is the detail.

If you didn’t know better, you might think the rifle is the real thing, and look close and you’ll see the “stitching” in the gear or veins on the Marine’s arm.

Godwin said the wedding band is there for a reason. It indicates family, the lives impacted when their loved ones gave the ultimate sacrifice in service to their country.

“In an artwork you want people to spend time viewing it,” she said. “The richer you can make it appear to them, the more they will look (at the artwork) and they will think about it.”

The Peacekeeper statue isn’t the first sculpture Godwin has done for a military memorial.

She also designed the North Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial, entitled After the Firefight, which stands on the grounds of the State Capitol in Raleigh. And she is currently working on the bronze statue for the Corpsmen Memorial, which will also be constructed at Lejeune Memorial Gardens.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Grieving woman’s heartfelt act of kindness at Florida Publix goes viral

A woman’s random act of kindness in a Florida grocery store has gone viral. She is a grieving grandmother who lost her grandson and wanted to do a good deed in the baby’s memory.

Nick DeClemente, who works at a Publix in Jacksonville, said the woman came up to the bakery counter last week and asked if they had any first birthday cakes. “She said she wanted to pay for one,” DeClemente told CBS News. “I asked what the customer name was, thinking she was paying for a specific person.”

The woman told DeClemente she wanted to pay for a cake anonymously. “She then started to tear up,” the Publix employee said. The woman told him her family was mourning a stillborn baby — her grandson. “So, in tribute to her grandson, she wanted to pay for someone else’s cake.”

DeClemente searched the cake orders and found one the woman could pay for. “She told me, ‘Thank you,’ and appreciated that I let her do this,” DeClemente said. “I can’t even tell you how beautiful a moment it was.”

DeClemente said he has never seen anything like this in his 20 years working in retail. He wrote a post on Facebook explaining the story. He said he originally thought the woman was talking about her own stillborn baby, but later learned that her name is Vanessa Phillips, and she is a grandmother.

“I have not seen the woman again who paid for the cake but I have been in touch with her,” DeClemente said.

Phillips commented on DeClemente’s Facebook post, as did nearly 100 other people. “If you read the comments on the post you can see that this action touched a lot of people, some people are offering strength some offering prayers and some are telling their own personal stories,” he said.

He said this interaction made him think about his young son and wife, who is about to give birth to their second child. “I couldn’t imagine being in this family’s shoes. I don’t know what I’d do without my little boy,” DeClemente said.

“This lady’s action spoke and speaks for a lot of women,” he said. “I love the good news it’s bringing to people instead of a lot of bad things we seem to hear about in the country and the world.”

The man’s Facebook post included two simple images of the cake order and Phillips’ receipt. DeClemente said he hopes he can find the family that received the cake, so he can get their reaction to the heartfelt gesture. “I wanted to share it because of just how good it was, how heartbreaking, but also so deeply heartfelt,” he said.

A lady just came up to the bakery counter and asked if we had any 1st birthday cakes on order for Saturday or Sunday
Posted by Nick DeClemente on Wednesday, October 10, 2018

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Competitor helps to lift up his fellow runner

It’s an act of kindness that is teaching us that it is not all about winning.

The kind gesture happened this weekend in Auburn during a cross country invitational. It came from a high school athlete who helped to pick up his competitor from Fairport.

You might consider Luke Fortner a pro at running cross country. After all he’s been at it for six years.

“It’s good I like it, it’s good,” he said.

His favorite part is being able to run fast. For his mom, Cindy Fortner it’s all about cheering him on.

“Alright no dogging it Luke,” she said as he trained.

She’s his number one fan and is proud of what her son has managed to accomplish.

“He enjoys it and sometimes he makes it look easy but, it’s hard and I think the other runners out there recognize that in their own way,” she said.

Luke is legally blind. It’s a challenge he doesn’t let stop him.

“Alright a couple of branches,” said his running aide as they ran during practice.

It’s verbal cues like those that help Luke navigate the terrain as he’s tethered along side his aide.

It’s a common practice he uses during cross county meets like he did this past weekend in Auburn.

“The finish on many races is up a hill,” said Luke’s mom.

The base of the hill was muddy causing him to lose his footing. Only to receive some unexpected help from his competitor.

“It might have been a teammate from a different team,” said Luke.

Without hesitation, Cazenovia High School sophomore Jake Tobin came swooping Luke up with the help of his running aide.

“We carried him up the hill and then he ran, he beat me by 5 seconds or something,” said Tobin.

It was an act of kindness and display of sportsmanship .

“To watch this young man do this it just made me feel like wow he had a great mom,” said Luke’s mom.

Jake’s gesture is now receiving national praise.

“I felt like it was something that should be done and just do it,” said Tobin.

As for this race the competition was put to the side.

“Thanks for doing that,” said Luke.

It’s a moment he won’t forget as he trains for his next race.

“We got to finish strong buddy, here we go,” said his aide as they wrapped up training.

Luke’s mom said he began running in elementary school. At the time his school had hired an aide to help him out much like one has today.

She believes Luke’s story has helped others who are visually impaired pursue running like he does.

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio

Police department gets heartfelt act of kindness

Let Lt. Chad Richardson describe the meaning of children’s acts of kindness to their local law enforcement agency.

“There is not a prouder feeling that can be felt as when a child looks at you and tells you ‘thank you’, stated Richardson.

Reegan Early wrote a letter to the Greer Police Department and hand delivered it with cookies. It was an Act of Kindness Reegan took personally.

“The officer (Corporal Roman Wilson) who met them was sweet and took a moment to take a picture with my daughters,” stated Bethany Early.

“Items from cookies, hand written notes, cards, or a simple thank you, make a world of difference to the men and women of the Greer Police Department,” stated Richardson. “It solidifies that the community still supports our mission as a police agency.”

 

Read the full story here

 

You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

You can also subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify blubrry, TuneIn, Stitcher and IHeartRadio