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Jayco celebrates 50 years with 50 acts of kindness

Monday was a big day for Middlebury-based Jayco RV. It was the 50th anniversary of the company’s founding.

To honor that, workers did 50 acts of kindness to give back to the community.

Customers at the BP station in Middlebury got quite a surprise when they got a free tank of gas pumped by J-Jay Bird representing Jayco RV.

“I think it’s very, very, nice of them to do and I really appreciate it,” said Lillian Carnes.

Lloyd and Bertha Bontrager started the company back in 1968.

“My father and mother when they started the business, they obviously didn’t have preconceived ideas that we would ever make 50 years, so it’s certainly been a long time but the time has really flown and we been blessed,” said Chairman Wilbur Bontrager.

To commemorate the anniversary, acts of kindness were performed at Jayco campuses in Middlebury, Topeka, Shipshewana, and Idaho.

“The Middlebury community has been very good to us. We had a lot of support from the area residents that we want to give back to our community and our employees,” said Bontrager.

Besides providing free gasoline, they also donated stuffed animals to the pediatric wards at local hospitals, gave free coffee and donuts to local police, fire agencies and city employees and donated books to local libraries.

Jayco also made a donation to Middlebury Schools for supplies and to the Boys and Girls Club for programs there.

“It’s a surprise, it’s exciting. For Jayco to provide this sort of surprise gift for us, not only for the school system but especially the Boys and Girls Club, it’s just indicative of what we have in our community,” said Superintendent Jane Allen.

 

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West Felton Primary take up kindness for Lent

West Felton Primary School is taking part in a 40 acts of kindness challenge for Lent.

40acts asks the question: what if Lent could be about more than just giving stuff up? What if it could be a time of increased kindness as well as spiritual discipline?

With this in mind, West Felton CofE Primary School launched the 40 acts of kindness for Lent on Wednesday, February 14.

Each child will receive a challenge card to complete by Thursday, March 29, on the card are 40 challenge; one for each day of Lent.

Some of the 40 Acts include things like be the first to say sorry to someone, ask somebody in the class what they most enjoyed about the day, play with a child from another year group, share your best joke today, look out for someone who is sad today and find a way to cheer them up.

Each child who completes the challenge will receive a certificate and kindness token in Golden Assembly.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Becca Schofield’s life and memory a lasting ‘legacy’ of kindness

Some say her message changed the world.

It was one that inspired hope, kindness, and sincerity and all started with a simple ask: for people on social media to do something kind for someone else.

Becca Schofield started the campaign, titled #BeccaToldMeTo, after she found out her brain cancer was terminal in December 2016.

Her movement was about spreading kindness locally but it quickly grew into a global movement.

Schofield died on Saturday at the age of 18. The date of her death — Feb. 17 — is observed by many as Random Acts of Kindness Day.

News of the Riverview, N.B., teen’s passing inspired an outpouring on social media.

Tammy Rampersaud, a councillor from Riverview, N.B. said she first met the family “under terrible circumstances,” but at the same time “under the most amazing circumstances too.”

“Becca’s ask alone, and what has been created from that, has not only touched us all, it’s brought us all together and made us better people,” she said.

Rampersaud said Schofield’s message “changed the world.”

“It’s changed my life so much,” she said. “She’s imprinted on me now and there honestly hasn’t been another human that’s affected my thought process more.”
‘I’m going to hold myself accountable to that forever’

Jason Tremere, a writer from Moncton, N.B., authored the book #BeccaToldMeTo: Spreading kindness, one hashtag at a time.

It’s a collection of more than 1,000 social media posts from people who shared their good deeds to help the teen reach her bucket list goal of creating a mass act of kindness.

 

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The Script shocks Aberdeen buskers with ‘random kindness’

Irish pop band The Script shocked two young buskers after plucking them from obscurity and putting them on stage in a Scottish arena.

Singer Danny O’Donoghue, guitarist Mark Sheehan and drummer Glen Power searched Aberdeen for buskers on “Random Acts of Kindness Day”.

When they found music college pals Shay Currie and Chris van der Wal, they invited them to a sound check.

But they ended up performing to 6,000 fans live on stage on Saturday night.

In a Twitter video, Mark Sheehan said they decided to seek out some buskers in order to “make their day”.

The band praised the young musicians, saying: “We decided to give them a taste of what can happen if you continue to be epic, work hard and chase your dream.”

Shay, 18, and Chris, 19, were performing guitar and percussion in their usual spot outside the Bon Accord Centre when they were approached.

The band told them they had started off by busking on the streets of Dublin before finding success.

Chris, a percussionist from Peterculter, told the BBC Scotland News website: “We didn’t think it was real.

“They just appeared and stood and listened to us.

“We even play one of their songs, Rain, when we are busking.

“Then they just asked us to come and jam with them at their sound check.”

The band asked the pair to come to the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre to experience a big stage.

But by the time they got to the end of the checks, Danny O’Donoghue had invited them to perform their song The Man Who Can’t Be Moved on stage with them that night.

Chris, who is studying to be a music teacher, said: “When we did the song in front of all those people it was only the second time we had played it all the way through.

“It was an amazing experience – we had so much adrenaline afterwards.”

Guitarist and singer Shay, from Hazlehead, who fronts a band called Meraki, said it was a life-changing experience.

 

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Rustburg High School students focus on kindness with new campaign

In a corner of the Rustburg High School library, a chain of multi-colored construction paper loops hangs from the bookshelves. Written on the construction paper are acts of kindness the high school students have performed since January.

The kindness chain is one aspect of the high school’s new kindness campaign in which community speakers encourage students to be kind to themselves, each other and the community.

“Kindness is an action, it can be a sacrifice of your time, it can be anything like that, but what kindness is not is something that you do regularly. Kindness is something that’s out of the ordinary,” librarian Casey Eccles told a group of about 30 students Friday before this month’s kindness presentation began.

Lavinia Garbee, a mental health counselor at Lynchburg’s Wishing You Well Counseling Center, spoke to the students about how to bring kindness into the community.

“I really believe that positivity is of utmost important. [Kindness] makes a tremendous difference. It doesn’t cost anything, and it’s contagious. It’s really a cool thing. It’s pretty easy to be nice to people,” Garbee said.

The kindness campaign started after Eccles approached RHS Principal Amy Hale at the beginning of the school year after the Charlottesville protests in August 2017, where white nationalists gathered for a “Unite the Right” rally and a car drove into a group of counter-protesters, killing one person.

“Instead of pointing fingers at different groups and what they should’ve done and other things, we wanted to try to change [to a] culture of positivity,” Eccles said.

The campaign started off with students signing a pledge — “I pledge to be kind every day at the high school, in the community and wherever I shall be” — and receiving a silver ribbon. Eccles said about 500 of the 855 students in the school have signed the pledge so far.

“We know that we need to continue to grow it and reach the other [350 students], so each month we also try to invite students that may not have been involved and give them that opportunity,” Hale said.

As part of the campaign, Eccles tries to schedule presenters once per month during the school day, and students are selected randomly to participate and talk about kindness. Each presentation has a different rotation of students in the school, including students involved in the tutoring center, club and team leaders and students who sign up to attend.

“I like that even though it started as an idea from Ms. Eccles, it’s really very much become student-led and a part that students have adopted and continue to emphasize, not just in school but beyond,” Hale said. “What we like about the kindness campaign is that it’s apolitical. It has nothing to do with what political side you’re on. It’s just about how to be a good human being.”

During Garbee’s presentation Friday, she shared an act of kindness she did at the Lynchburg Regional Airport, which was buying a soda for a stranger.

“Everybody in there is watching this. I bought the man a soda. I felt good. Throughout the entire rest of that trip, I thought, I wonder how much ripple that might’ve had because [kindness] is so contagious,” Garbee said to the students.

Afterward, the students brainstormed ideas of what they can do to bring kindness into the community, such as helping people put their groceries in their cars, being nice to competitors at athletic events, writing thank-you notes and paying it forward at restaurants.

“I’m hoping they go out into the world and throw kindness like confetti,” Garbee said.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Kirby encourages fans to perform random acts of kindness at Comic Con

While the nation celebrates Random Acts of Kindness Day this weekend, Kirby, the charming hero known for his powerful Copy Abilities, is preparing a celebration of his own at this year’s Emerald City Comic Con in Seattle.

Attendees of Emerald City Comic Con will not only be among the first to play the Kirby Star Allies game for the Nintendo Switch system and try out Kirby’s new Copy Abilities before the game launches on March 16, they will also have the chance to earn cool Kirby themed items for being nice to people around them – just like Kirby himself!

In Kirby’s new game, he uses a new ability to turn his enemies into friends to create a powerful team to save Planet Popstar.

But despite his friendly appearance, Kirby brings some seriously powerful new moves and abilities to his new game that would even impress the most hardened video game players. In fact, Kirby’s moves in Kirby Star Allies are some of his most powerful and impressive yet.

And just like Kirby, attendees of Emerald City Comic Con will have the opportunity to unleash some powerful moves of their own – the power to make the world a better place through acts of kindness! Kirby would be so proud.

Select Nintendo representatives will be walking around Emerald City Comic Con March 1-4 to reward people for performing random acts of kindness for other people. If these mobile Nintendo teams catch a Comic Con attendee doing something nice, from holding the door for a stranger to picking up litter, that person will get the chance to earn fun Kirby themed items.

These same mobile teams will also be surprising people waiting in lines around the convention with the opportunity to play Kirby Star Allies for Nintendo Switch in Handheld Mode. The game will also be available to play at the Nintendo booth in TV Mode.

“Many of our classic characters are heroes in numerous ways, but Kirby epitomizes what it’s like to be powerful, but also kind,” said Cindy Gordon, Nintendo of America’s Vice President of Strategic Communications. “While we love bringing our games directly to fans at events like this, we wanted to do something a little different this time to show that teamwork and kindness are two of the most powerful forces around.”

Kirby Star Allies is one of the largest and most robust games in the Kirby series – and the first on Nintendo Switch! In the game, Kirby can recruit enemies by tossing out hearts to gather friends for a party of up to four characters.

This newly formed party can be used to solve clever puzzles or unleash powerful friend abilities. In addition to familiar Copy Abilities like Sword, Fire, Ice, Stone, Bomb and more, Kirby will have access to new abilities like Spider, Artist and Staff.

Some Copy abilities can even be imbued with different elements, such as wind, water, fire and electricity. Kirby uses this large collection of powerful moves and abilities to make his way through a wide variety of colorful and challenging worlds.

Up to four players can play together in local co-op, with one player controlling Kirby and, for the first time in the series, the other players taking control of the recruited enemies (additional accessories may be required in multiplayer mode). Players can still embark on the adventure solo, though, with team members automatically controlled by the game.

 

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Brookdale Riverwalk seniors, staff hand out flowers, kindness

It’s not every day that a stranger comes up to you, says hello and gives you a flower, but that’s the experience many people had around town Friday.

Senior living community Brookdale Riverwalk held its second annual Random Acts of Kindness Day on Friday. Residents and associates went out to the Park at River Walk, Almondale Elementary School, Rosewood Skilled Nursing and several other places to deliver a total of 500 flowers, as well as hugs, handshakes and smiles.

“I think it’s especially important these days to be reminded that we can make others feel good with very small gestures or words or deeds. It means a lot these days,” said resident Betty Newman, who helped prepare the flowers and delivered them Friday.

Newman said that to her, it’s normal now for people to be rude or disrespectful to others, or they don’t show any care for other people. Newman said activities like the one on Friday may have a stronger impact on people who don’t usually receive kindness from strangers.

“Sometimes you have to make a bit of an effort to make people feel good about themselves, let them know that they are special,” she said. “I think they’re more apt to do the same for others if it happens to them.”

Diane Ashburn, director of financial services at Brookdale, helped hand out the flowers this year. This is the first year that management has been able to participate in Random Acts of Kindness Day, as it was just a residents-only activity last year.

Only about 100 flowers were given out in 2017. The event grew into a communitywide activity this year.

“It was wonderful. People really responded positively,” she said. “It was a really neat experience to be able to do that and see them light up.”

At the Park at River Walk on Stockdale Highway, Daniel Cepeda was playing with his 4-year-old son, Isaac, when several residents and associates from Brookdale Riverwalk came up to them and each handed them a flower.

“It’s really nice. It shows that there are some good people in this world,” he said.

Desiree Armendariz was reading a book while her husband was fishing at the park. She said she was pleasantly surprised by the gesture.

“It made my day. I’m sure it’ll make other people’s days, too,” she said.

While making people’s days a little brighter was a major focus of the event, resident Juanita Blackwell said getting out of Brookdale Riverwalk also does a lot of good for the residents’ health, physically, emotionally and spiritually.

“We need to be out with other people. We need to be out doing something,” she said. “You can feel pretty hemmed in if you just stay here all the time. You can get to feeling old. Just because I’m 90 doesn’t mean I need to feel old.”

Newman said participating in events like Random Acts of Kindness Day makes the residents feel that they are making a difference in the community, even if it’s a small, short-lived one.

“It isn’t just the recipient who feels better. I think the giver is rewarded even more,” she said. “To think you’ve made someone, even if for a very brief time, enjoy the day more and feel better about themselves is a great thing.”

 

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Random acts of kindness in Port aux Basques

It has been said no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.

Members of Peaceful Communities are celebrating Random Acts of Kindness Week in the Port aux Basques area by handing out gift cards to strangers.

“We gave out the cards today, there were many hugs,” committee member Jodie Mercer said when contacted by phone on Feb. 15.

The Peaceful Communities Committee, which has more than 20 members, serves the province’s southwest coast and falls under the umbrella of the Southwestern Coalition to End Violence.

The coalition is funded by the provincial government.

Small gestures of kindness (in the form of a token coffee, grocery or gas card) are great not only for the person receiving them, but also for those giving them out, Mercer said.

“It’s a small thing you are doing but it’s an awesome feeling to do it. And there wasn’t one person we approached that didn’t say thank-you,” she said.

February is Violence Prevention Month, and while Feb. 12-18 has been set aside as Random Acts of Kindness Week, such simple gestures are something we can all do every day.

“If at least one person who we gave a card to does something nice for someone else, then we’ve achieved our goal,” Mercer said.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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‘Kindness rocks’ Ivy Tech students, staff encourage all to be kind

For Anarae Silverwillow, kindness is a lifestyle.

Given the current state of the world right now, Silverwillow said it’s easy to be judgmental or reactive toward situations. But the Ivy Tech Community College Evansville student believes everyone is naturally prone to be kind and personable.

But sometimes, she said, we forget.

To help remind people of the importance of kindness, Ivy Tech Evansville campus kicked off its first-ever Kindness Campaign this month. This entire week many students and staff wore pink heart-shaped “Be Kind” buttons, heart-shaped notes with positive messages decorated the halls and everyone was encouraged to perform random acts of kindness.
To help remind people the importance of kindness, Ivy

To help remind people the importance of kindness, Ivy Tech Community College Evansville hosted its first-ever Kindness Campaign this week. Many students and staff wore pink heart-shaped “Be Kind” buttons, heart-shaped notes with positive messages decorated the halls and on Valentine’s Day anyone could paint a rock to hide for someone else to find. (Photo: Provided: Ivy Tech Evansville)

It can be as simple as holding the door for someone or giving your child a hug, according to Amy Lutzel, Ivy Tech wellness director.

One random act of kindness can change someone’s entire day, she said, but we often get too busy in our own lives to offer a small positive gesture.

“All human beings need affection to thrive and even small acts of kindness can touch someone deeply and make their day,” she said.

When someone is kind to Silverwillow, it makes her want to pay it forward.

“That’s the beauty of kindness,” she said. “It’s not a greedy feeling. You don’t hold onto it. It makes you want to give that feeling to somebody else.”

On Valentine’s Day, Ivy Tech students could paint a kindness rock and hide it for someone to find, write a note to someone and get a free hug and kiss – of the Hershey’s chocolate variety.
Ivy Tech Community College Evansville students paint

Ivy Tech Community College Evansville students paint rocks on Valentine’s Day as part of the community college’s Kindness Campaign. This week many students and staff wore pink heart-shaped “Be Kind” buttons, heart-shaped notes with positive messages decorated the halls and on painted rocks to hide for someone else to find. (Photo: Megan Erbacher)

While painting a Hello Kitty scene Wednesday on a rock, Trenton Terrell said he believes kindness is necessary.

“It allows you to see self-worth that you might not have seen, but other people show it to you,” the Ivy Tech student said. “It also allows you to see the worth in yourself when you can give somebody else that gift of kindness. It’s free to give, and it’s a gift that keeps on giving.”

Terrell planned to give the rock to his girlfriend.

“I think it’s going to mean more to her than the stuff I bought her,” he said. “Knowing I took the time out of my day because I could be playing pool.”

Collin Maxwell Almquist, Ivy Tech student, said it’s easier to feel comfortable and stable when you talk to someone who is nice to you.
To help remind people the importance of kindness, Ivy

To help remind people the importance of kindness, Ivy Tech Community College Evansville hosted its first-ever Kindness Campaign this week. Many students and staff wore pink heart-shaped “Be Kind” buttons, heart-shaped notes with positive messages decorated the halls and on Valentine’s Day anyone could paint a rock to hide for someone else to find. (Photo: Megan Erbacher)

Ivy Tech student Joshua Anderson agreed.

“(Kindness) brings us all together,” he said. “Even with our differences, it just brings us all together to talk human to human, person to person.”

Students were also encouraged to write the kindness they offered or nice acts people have done for them on a banner to be displayed at the college. Silverwillow said she helped lighten her husband’s workload and jump-started a car for a stranger.

The events were sponsored by Ivy Tech’s Wellness and Fitness Center, Student Life and Counseling Center.

Lutzel explained studies have shown the positive effects of kindness are experienced in the brain of everyone who witnessed the act, improving their mood and making them significantly more likely to “pay it forward.”

People need to be kind more often, she said.

“Just think how much more productive we would be if we could practice kindness to everyone every day,” she said. “We would have more energy, better relationships, be less depressed and be generally happy. Our hope is that more companies and organizations will follow suit.”

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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Act of kindness from complete strangers for gran with dementia

A woman is searching for two complete strangers after their heart-warming act of kindness put a smile on the face of her grandmother, who has dementia.

Kate Taylor, 37, cares for her grandmother Margaret Goodwin who was diagnosed with dementia two years ago.

Mrs Goodwin, who is 83, sits by the window of the family’s home in Woolton Village and waves at the children and adults who walk past each day.

Yesterday, the family woke to find a surprise waiting for them, after two of the people who wave at Mrs Goodwin dropped off a bunch of flowers and a touching letter.

Mum-of-four Kate said: “When we got up in the morning we said ‘it’s cold in the hall’ and it was because the letter box was jammed open. My husband went over and it was a bunch of daffodils and a letter.”

The letter, signed by “the walkers who wave” called Anne and Trevor, says: “Wishing our lady in the window a very happy Valentine’s Day! We hope you like the daffodils.”

She said: “It put a massive smile on my face. I don’t think there’s any words for it. We don’t know these people, they don’t know her, they’ve never spoken to her – but they decided they would think about her and do something for her.”

Sharing a photo of the flowers and letter on Facebook, Kate said: “In a world full of tragedy and bad news it warms my heart to find this in our letter box this morning.
Kate Taylor said this letter, left by two complete strangers, put a massive smile on her face (Image: Kate Taylor)

“My gran has dementia, she sits and watches the world go by through the front window. Lots of school children and locals wave as they go past.

“This is by far the sweetest, most thoughtful gesture. It put a huge smile on my face and the note will be kept to show gran when she’s having a bad day.

“If anyone knows Anne and Trevor, ‘the walkers who wave’, please give them my thanks.”

Kate was brought up by her grandmother in their family home in Woolton Village, and bought the house from Mrs Goodwin when she grew up.

 

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You can also find us on Twitter @holakindness and Facebook The Kindness Project, we would love to hear your kindness story’s so please get in touch!

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